Share on WeChat
https://www.powervoter.us:443/gregory_abbott
Copy the link and open WeChat to share.
 Share on WeChat
Copy the link and open WeChat to share.
 Share on WeChat
Scan QRCode using WeChat,and then click the icon at the top-right corner of your screen.
 Share on WeChat
Scan QRCode using WeChat,and then click the icon at the top-right corner of your screen.

Gregory Abbott (I)

R
Quick Facts
Personal Details

Greg Abbott (Republican Party) is the Governor of Texas. He assumed office in 2015. His current term ends on January 17, 2023.

Abbott (Republican Party) ran for re-election for Governor of Texas. He won in the general election on November 6, 2018.

Abbott previously served as the Attorney General of Texas. He was first elected to the post in 2002 following previous Attorney General John Cornyn's (R) election to the U.S. Senate. Abbott was re-elected in 2006 and 2010. He also served on the Texas Supreme Court from 1995 to 2001 after being appointed by former Gov. George W. Bush (R), and as a Texas State District judge in Harris County.

Abbott became paralyzed from the waist down when he was struck by a falling tree at age 26.

Greg Abbott is a native Texan, born in Wichita Falls and raised in Duncanville. He attended the University of Texas for his undergraduate degree in finance, and then proceeded to earn his J.D. from Vanderbilt University Law School. After graduation in 1984, Abbott began a legal career in the private sector.

Abbott initially entered state politics in Houston, where he was selected to serve as a state trial judge on the 129th District Court for three years beginning in 1993. Following that he was appointed by then-Governor George W. Bush to the Texas State Supreme Court, and was subsequently elected to the post twice more—first in 1996 to a two-year term and then again in 1998 for a six-year term. During this period, Abbott returned to private practice as an attorney for the law firm of Bracewell and Patterson Limited Liability Partnership.

Education

  • Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree in finance, University of Texas, (1981)
  • Juris Doctorate degree, Vanderbilt University Law School (1984)

Caucuses/Former Committees

Member, Governor's Committee to Promote Adoption

Chair, Texas Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force

Education

  • JD, Vanderbilt University Law School, 1984
  • BBA, Finance, University of Texas, 1981

Professional Experience

  • JD, Vanderbilt University Law School, 1984
  • BBA, Finance, University of Texas, 1981
  • Adjunct Professor, Texas Constitutional Law, University of Texas School of Law
  • Attorney, Bracewell and Patterson Limited Liability Partnership, 2001-2002
  • Texas Supreme Court Justice, Texas Supreme Court, 1996-2001
  • Judge, 129th District Court, Houston, Texas, 1993-1995
  • Attorney, Butler and Binion Limited Liability Partnership, 1984-1992

Political Experience

  • JD, Vanderbilt University Law School, 1984
  • BBA, Finance, University of Texas, 1981
  • Adjunct Professor, Texas Constitutional Law, University of Texas School of Law
  • Attorney, Bracewell and Patterson Limited Liability Partnership, 2001-2002
  • Texas Supreme Court Justice, Texas Supreme Court, 1996-2001
  • Judge, 129th District Court, Houston, Texas, 1993-1995
  • Attorney, Butler and Binion Limited Liability Partnership, 1984-1992
  • Governor, States of Texas, 2015-present
  • Candidate, Texas State Governor, 2018
  • Attorney General, State of Texas, 2002-2015

Former Committees/Caucuses

Member, Governor's Committee to Promote Adoption

Chair, Texas Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

  • JD, Vanderbilt University Law School, 1984
  • BBA, Finance, University of Texas, 1981
  • Adjunct Professor, Texas Constitutional Law, University of Texas School of Law
  • Attorney, Bracewell and Patterson Limited Liability Partnership, 2001-2002
  • Texas Supreme Court Justice, Texas Supreme Court, 1996-2001
  • Judge, 129th District Court, Houston, Texas, 1993-1995
  • Attorney, Butler and Binion Limited Liability Partnership, 1984-1992
  • Governor, States of Texas, 2015-present
  • Candidate, Texas State Governor, 2018
  • Attorney General, State of Texas, 2002-2015
  • Member, Advisory Board, Career and Recovery Resources Incorporated
  • Member, Central Texas Chapter, Goodwill Industries
  • Former Member, Delta Tau Delta Fraternity
  • Member, Justice for All
  • Former Trustee, Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research Foundation
  • Honorary State Chair, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Texas, 2004

Other Info

— Awards:

  • Protect-Her Award, New Friends New Life, 2013

  • Insurance Salesman

Hobbies or Special Talents:

Hunting

  • Homemaker

Spouse's Occupation:

Former School Teacher/Principal

Elections

2018

General election
General election for Governor of Texas

Incumbent Greg Abbott defeated Lupe Valdez and Mark Tippetts in the general election for Governor of Texas on November 6, 2018.

Greg Abbott (R)
55.8%
4,656,196 Votes

Lupe Valdez (D)
42.5%
3,546,615 Votes

Mark Tippetts (L)
1.7%
140,632 Votes

Total votes: 8,343,443

Democratic primary runoff election
Democratic primary runoff for Governor of Texas

Lupe Valdez defeated Andrew White in the Democratic primary runoff for Governor of Texas on May 22, 2018.

Lupe Valdez
53.0%
224,091 Votes

Andrew White
47.0%
198,407 Votes

Total votes: 422,498

Democratic primary election
Democratic primary for Governor of Texas

The following candidates ran in the Democratic primary for Governor of Texas on March 6, 2018.

Lupe Valdez
42.9%
435,484 Votes

Andrew White
27.4%
278,333 Votes

Cedric Davis
8.3%
83,817 Votes

Grady Yarbrough
5.4%
54,372 Votes

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Jeffrey Payne
4.8%
48,269 Votes

Adrian Ocegueda
4.4%
44,681 Votes

Thomas Wakely
3.4%
34,737 Votes

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

James Clark
2.2%
21,871 Votes

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Joe Mumbach
1.4%
13,878 Votes

Total votes: 1,015,442

Republican primary election
Republican primary for Governor of Texas

Incumbent Greg Abbott defeated Barbara Krueger and Larry SECEDE Kilgore in the Republican primary for Governor of Texas on March 6, 2018.

Greg Abbott
90.4%
1,389,562 Votes

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Barbara Krueger
8.3%
127,134 Votes

Larry SECEDE Kilgore
1.3%
20,384 Votes

Total votes: 1,537,080

Withdrawn or disqualified candidates

  • Janis Richards (G)


2014

Abbott ran for Governor of Texas in the 2014 election. Abbott won the Republican nomination in the primary. Incumbent Gov. Rick Perry (R) did not seek re-election. Abbott was endorsed by Empower Texans. The general election took place on November 4, 2014.

Results

Primary election

Texas Gubernatorial Republican Primary, 2014

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Abbott 91.5% 1,224,014
Lisa Fritsch 4.4% 59,221
Miriam Martinez 2.7% 35,585
SECEDE Kilgore 1.4% 19,055
Total Votes 1,337,875
Election results via Texas Secretary of State.
General election

Governor of Texas, 2014

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Abbott 59.3% 2,796,547
Democratic Wendy Davis 38.9% 1,835,596
Libertarian Kathie Glass 1.4% 66,543
Green Brandon Parmer 0.4% 18,520
Write-in Sarah Pavitt 0% 1,062
Total Votes 4,718,268
Election results via Texas Secretary of State

2010

  • 2010 Race for Attorney General - Republican Primary
  • Greg Abbott ran unopposed in this contest

Texas Attorney General, 2010

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Abbott Incumbent 64.1% 3,151,064
Democratic Barbara Ann Radnofsky 33.7% 1,655,859
Libertarian Jon Roland 2.3% 112,118
Total Votes 4,919,041
Election results via Texas Secretary of State

2006

  • 2006 Race for Attorney General - Republican Primary
  • Greg Abbott ran unopposed in this contest

On November 7, 2006, Greg Abbott won re-election to the office of Texas Attorney General. He defeated David Van Os (D) and Jon Roland (L) in the general election.

Texas Attorney General, 2006

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Abbott Incumbent 59.5% 2,556,063
Democratic David Van Os 37.2% 1,599,069
Libertarian Jon Roland 3.3% 139,668
Total Votes 4,294,800
Election results via Texas Secretary of State.

2002

  • 2002 Race for Attorney General - Republican Primary
  • Greg Abbott ran unopposed in this contest

Texas Attorney General, 2002

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Abbott Incumbent 56.7% 2,542,184
Democratic Kirk Watson 41.1% 1,841,359
Libertarian Jon Roland 1.3% 56,880
Green David Keith Cobb 0.9% 41,560
Total Votes 4,481,983
Election results via Texas Secretary of State
Endorsements
Texas Right to Life PAC
Dallas Police Association
Houston Police Officer's Union
Speeches
Articles

Fox News - Arizona & Texas Govs. Ducey and Abbott: Barrett deserves quick Senate confirmation to Supreme Court

Oct. 16, 2020

By Greg Abbott and Doug Ducey In Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump could not have picked a better, more qualified person to serve on the United States Supreme Court. An accomplished jurist, Notre Dame law professor, and mom of seven, Judge Barrett possesses the strength of intellect, high moral character and dedication to the rule of law befitting our nation's highest court. She is also a model of decency and civility, as countless colleagues of hers have attested to over the years. We join governors from around the country to strongly support her nomination. The Senate should confirm her without delay. Judge Barrett's qualifications are without question. After graduating summa cum laude and first in her class from Notre Dame Law School, she clerked at the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and at the Supreme Court for Justice Antonin Scalia. A professor of law for 15 years, Judge Barrett's academic scholarship -- which has focused on constitutional interpretation, stare decisis, and statutory interpretation -- is profound and impactful. It's also been highly recognized. She was named "distinguished professor of the year" by three graduating classes and has been published extensively in top law journals throughout the country. Judge Barrett's remarkable legal career to date is impressive on its own. But it's the universal respect and admiration she's earned from her colleagues that really stands out. Supporting her nomination to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, her fellow Supreme Court clerks stated: "We are Democrats, Republicans, and independents, and we have diverse points of view on politics, judicial philosophy, and much else. Yet we all write to support the nomination of Professor Barrett. ... Professor Barrett is a woman of remarkable intellect and character. She is eminently qualified for the job." Her colleagues at Notre Dame expressed similar, unanimous praise in 2017, writing: "As a scholarly community, we have a wide range of political views, as well as commitments to different approaches to judicial methodology and judicial craft. We are united, however, in our judgment about Amy. ... She possesses in abundance all of the other qualities that shape extraordinary jurists: discipline, intellect, wisdom, impeccable temperament, and above all, fundamental decency and humanity." As a judge, Judge Barrett has consistently demonstrated the utmost impartiality and restraint -- qualities essential to the equal interpretation of the law. As she stated at the announcement of her nomination: "A judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers, and they must be resolute in setting aside any policy views they might hold." In this, Judge Barrett's rhetoric has matched her judicial record. Americans can be confident that Judge Barrett will continue to interpret the law and the Constitution as it is written. This is especially important when it comes to the separation of powers enshrined in our founding documents. As elected leaders of our states, we believe strongly in preserving the proper roles of our three co-equal branches of government. Judge Barrett's record proves she does too. In addition to her distinguished legal career, Judge Barrett is a woman of immense moral character, someone who is devoted to her country, community, family and faith -- like so many Americans. As a working parent, devoted daughter and engaged member of her community, Judge Barrett understands the struggles and joys of families throughout this country. If appointed, she would become just the fifth woman in history to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, and the first mother of school-age children. She is a justice for her time, as qualified and prepared as few in her position have ever been to serve in this incredible capacity. There's no doubt that Judge Amy Coney Barrett will make an excellent addition to the Supreme Court. We urge all senators to support her swift confirmation without delay.

Affordable Care Act lawsuit

Jan. 1, 1900

Abbott was one of 13 state attorneys general who initiated a 2010 lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The suit argued that the individual mandate fell outside of the federal government’s authority and that the requirement for state Medicaid expansion of coverage violated state sovereignty. The case was ultimately heard before the Supreme Court, which ruled to uphold the individual mandate as falling within Congress’ authority to levy taxes and struck down the Medicaid expansion as being unduly coercive in light of the withholding of funding that would result from noncompliance. EPA lawsuit Abbott filed suit in federal court on February 16, 2010, to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from instituting regulation of greenhouse gases. The decision by the EPA to moderate the release of greenhouse gases was based on a review that declared carbon dioxide a danger to public health, saying it contributes to global warming. Abbott, in conjunction with Governor Rick Perry, objected to the move, arguing that it would place a financial burden on state businesses and homeowners and that it would jeopardize jobs. Both state officials believed that the finding was based on faulty science. The D.C. Circuit Court ruled in favor of the EPA in 2012. Ten Commandments monument case: Van Orden v. Perry (2005) In 2002, Thomas Van Orden, a resident of Austin, sued the state of Texas in federal district court over a monument of the Ten Commandments located on the grounds of the state capitol building. He believed this to be a violation of "the First Amendment's establishment clause, which prohibits the government from passing laws 'respecting an establishment of religion.'" The United States Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit disagreed, ruling a year later that the "monument served a valid secular purpose and would not appear to a reasonable observer to represent a government endorsement of religion." Van Orden appealed the decision and on October 12, 2004, the Supreme Court of the United States agreed to hear the case. Attorney General of Texas Greg Abbott appeared before the high court on March 2, 2005, defending the state's Ten Commandments monument, arguing that the grounds surrounding the capitol building contained 17 monuments and 21 historical markers commemorating the "people, ideals, and events that compose Texan identity" and that the Commandments were just one of them. In a five-to-four decision delivered on June 27, 2005, the opinion of the Supreme Court, delivered by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, "deemed the Texas monument part of the nation's tradition of recognizing the Ten Commandments' historical meaning" and therefore was constitutional. Even though the Ten Commandments are of a religious nature, simply having religious content or promoting a message in line with religious teachings, the court stated, "does not run afoul of the establishment clause." Justice Stephen Breyer, who served as the swing vote in the case, wrote: "The circumstances surrounding the monument's placement on the capitol grounds and its physical setting provide a strong, but not conclusive, indication that the Commandments' text as used on this monument conveys a predominantly secular message … The determinative factor here, however, is that 40 years passed in which the monument's presence, legally speaking, went unchallenged ... Those 40 years suggest more strongly than can any set of formulaic tests that few individuals ... are likely to have understood the monument as amounting ... to a government effort to establish religion." Hailing the Supreme Court's decision, Abbott said, "This is a great victory not just for Texans, but for all Americans. With this ruling, the United States Supreme Court has delivered a clear message that the Texas Ten Commandments can be displayed on public grounds in recognition of the historical role they have played in the foundation of this country and its laws." Creation of sex crime task forces In 2003, Abbott created the Cyber Crimes Unit to find and arrest those using the internet to commit sex crimes involving children. Abbott also established the Fugitive Unit with the purpose of finding and arresting those violating parole whose convictions involve a sex crime against a child.

As state attorney general

Jan. 1, 1900

Sanctuary city letter Abbott wrote a letter in 2015 to Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez criticizing Valdez' immigrant detention policy and calling for a law targeting cities that ban police from asking about a person's immigration status. His letter read, in part, “ "Sanctuary City" policies like those promoted by your recent decision to implement your own case-by-case immigrant detention plan will no longer be tolerated in Texas. Your decision to not fully honor ICE’s requests to detain criminal immigrants poses a serious danger to Texans. These detainers provide ICE with the critical notice and time it needs to take incarcerated immigrants into federal custody. ” —Greg Abbott, Texas Voter ID law When the Supreme Court overturned a section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act on July 25, 2013, a Texas Voter ID law that had been federally denied went into effect. Abbott led the push for the law after launching an investigation into voter fraud in Texas. Texas' photo ID law, SB14, previously required pre-clearance by the USDOJ before going into effect which was denied on March 13, 2012. On August 30, 2012, a three-judge panel in United States District Court for the District of Columbia unanimously struck down the Texas photo voter identification law. The court ruled that the law would hurt minority voter turnout and impose strict burdens on the poor. Following the Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act in 2013, SB 14 went into effect. The law faced legal challenges and was blocked during the 2016 elections. In April 2018, the United States Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit ruled to allow the state to enact a modified version of the voter ID law that allows people to vote by signing a declaration if they do not have a photo ID. Domestic partner benefits opinion On April 29, 2013, Abbott issued a legal opinion stating that domestic partner benefits offered by the city of Austin, Travis County, and area school districts are illegal under the Texas Constitution. Texas voters approved the constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriages or similar legal statuses in 2005. According to Abbott's opinion, “By creating domestic partnerships and offering health benefits based on them, the political subdivisions have created and recognized something not established by Texas law.” The U.S. Supreme Court's 2015 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges struck down same-sex marriage bans.