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Quick Facts
Personal Details

Heidi Heitkamp (Democratic Party) was a member of the U.S. Senate from North Dakota. She assumed office on January 3, 2013. She left office on January 3, 2019.

Heitkamp (Democratic Party) ran for re-election to the U.S. Senate to represent North Dakota. She lost in the general election on November 6, 2018.

Prior to becoming a senator in 2012, Heitkamp was on the board of directors of Dakota Gasification. Her experience as an elected official in the North Dakota state government includes serving two terms as attorney general and two terms as state tax commissioner.

Heitkamp is a native of Mantador, North Dakota, born into a large family of seven children. Her brother, Joel Heitkamp, is a former Democratic member of the North Dakota State Senate. Heitkamp graduated with a bachelor's degree from the University of North Dakota in 1977 and went on to earn her J.D. from Lewis & Clark Law School in 1980.

Heitkamp has worked as an attorney and as a consultant. She is a former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency attorney and director for a synfuels plant based in North Dakota.

Below is an abbreviated outline of Heitkamp's academic, professional, and political career:

  • 2013-2019: U.S. Senator from North Dakota
  • 2001-2013: Director of Dakota Gasification
  • 2000: Ran for Governor of North Dakota, lost in general election
  • 1993-2000: North Dakota Attorney General
  • 1986-1993: North Dakota Tax Commissioner (Appointed December 2, 1986; Elected 1988)
  • 1981-1986: Attorney for North Dakota Tax Commissioner Office
  • 1980-1981: Attorney for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Education

  • JD, Lewis & Clark Law School, 1980
  • BA, University of North Dakota, 1977

Professional Experience

  • JD, Lewis & Clark Law School, 1980
  • BA, University of North Dakota, 1977
  • Director, Dakota Gasification Synfuels Plant, present
  • Former Tax Commissioner, State of North Dakota
  • Lawyer, Office of the North Dakota State Tax Commissioner, 1986-1992
  • Lawyer, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1980-1981

Political Experience

  • JD, Lewis & Clark Law School, 1980
  • BA, University of North Dakota, 1977
  • Director, Dakota Gasification Synfuels Plant, present
  • Former Tax Commissioner, State of North Dakota
  • Lawyer, Office of the North Dakota State Tax Commissioner, 1986-1992
  • Lawyer, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1980-1981
  • Senator, United States Senate, 2012-2019
  • Candidate, United States Senate, New Dakota, 2018
  • Candidate, Governor of North Dakota, 2000
  • Attorney General, State of North Dakota, 1993-2000

Former Committees/Caucuses

Former Member, Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee, United States Senate

Former Member, Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee, United States Senate

Former Member, Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, United States Senate

Former Member, Indian Affairs Committee, United States Senate

Former Member, Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, United States Senate

Former Member, Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, United States Senate

Former Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Commodities, Risk Management and Trade, United States Senate

Former Member, Subcommittee on Conservation, Forestry, and Natural Resources, United States Senate

Former Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Economic Policy, United States Senate

Former Member, Subcommittee on Housing, Transportation, and Community Development, United States Senate

Former Member, Subcommittee on Livestock, Marketing and Agriculture Security, United States Senate

Former Member, Subcommittee on National Security and International Trade and Finance, United States Senate

Former Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs and Federal Management, United States Senate

Former Member, Subcommittee on Rural Development and Energy, United States Senate

Other Info

  • Truck driver, seasonal construction worker

  • School cook and custodian

  • Golden Retreiver named Copper
  • Tabby Cat named Sport

Policy Positions

2020

Abortion

Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-choice

Budget

1. In order to balance the budget, do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- Yes

2. In order to balance the budget, do you support reducing defense spending?
- No

Campaign Finance

Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Yes

Economy

1. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

2. Do you support lowering corporate taxes as a means of promoting economic growth?
- No

Education

Do you support requiring states to adopt federal education standards?
- Yes

Energy & Environment

1. Do you support government funding for the development of renewable energy (e.g. solar, wind, thermal)?
- Yes

2. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- Yes

Guns

Do you generally support gun-control legislation?
- No

Health Care

Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")?
- No

Immigration

1. Do you support the construction of a wall along the Mexican border?
- Yes

2. Do you support requiring immigrants who are unlawfully present to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- No

Marijuana

Do you support the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes?
- Yes

National Security

1. Should the United States use military force in order to prevent governments hostile to the U.S. from possessing a nuclear weapon?
- Unknown Position

2. Do you support increased American intervention in Middle Eastern conflicts beyond air support?
- Yes

Congress Bills
Elections

2018

General election
General election for U.S. Senate North Dakota

Kevin Cramer defeated incumbent Heidi Heitkamp and Thomas O'Neill in the general election for U.S. Senate North Dakota on November 6, 2018.

Kevin Cramer (R)
55.1%
179,720 Votes

Heidi Heitkamp (D)
44.3%
144,376 Votes
Other/Write-in votes
0.6%
2,042 Votes

Total votes: 326,138
(100.00% precincts reporting)

Democratic election
Democratic primary for U.S. Senate North Dakota

Incumbent Heidi Heitkamp advanced from the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate North Dakota on June 12, 2018.

Heidi Heitkamp
100.0%
36,729 Votes

Total votes: 36,729

Republican election
Republican primary for U.S. Senate North Dakota

Kevin Cramer defeated Thomas O'Neill in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate North Dakota on June 12, 2018.

Kevin Cramer
87.9%
61,529 Votes

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Thomas O'Neill
12.1%
8,509 Votes

Total votes: 70,038

2012

U.S. Senate, North Dakota General Election, 2012

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngHeidi Heitkamp 50.5% 161,337
Republican Rick Berg 49.5% 158,401
Total Votes 319,738
Source: North Dakota Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
Speeches
Articles

Bismarck Tribune - We Need Practical Solutions -- Not Political Soundbites -- on Health Care

Oct. 28, 2018

By U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp One of the greatest privileges of serving as your U.S. senator is meeting North Dakotans of all walks of life, hearing about the challenges families overcome, and rolling up my sleeves to help tackle the issues they're facing. The stories I hear motivate me to wake up every day and fight for North Dakotans, and that was the case when I met Allison. Today, Allison is a high school senior in West Fargo. But unlike her classmates, she needs $300,000 worth of medication every year just to stay alive. Before the Affordable Care Act, Allison's insurance bills totaled $1.7 million -- and she was dangerously close to reaching her lifetime insurance limit, meaning her family would have to start paying out-of-pocket for her medical expenses. Allison's family faced financial ruin -- but thankfully, patient protections in the health care law saved Allison's life. Under current law, Allison and her family are protected from lifetime caps, and Allison can't be denied coverage because of her preexisting conditions. I support provisions in the health reform law that are working, like those that keep Allison alive and healthy. But the difference between me and my opponent couldn't be more clear. Kevin Cramer supports attempts to repeal these life-saving protections, potentially endangering Allison once again and saddling her family with outrageous health care costs, while I've been working hard to fix what's broken. I'll be the first and loudest to say that the health care law isn't perfect. When I was elected, I formed a health care advisory board -- made up of North Dakota patients, providers, health care administrators and experts -- to find solutions to fix what isn't working for North Dakota. This group has developed ideas to improve rural health care, address maternal mortality, and start bringing costs down. And I've worked across the aisle with Republicans to delay the Health Insurance Tax that would have made health care even more expensive for North Dakota families and small businesses. But when Mitch McConnell brought up partisan health care bills that would have hurt our families, I voted no and went to bat for North Dakota. The Senate repeal bills were deeply partisan and downright dangerous. They were opposed by patient groups like the North Dakota Hospital Association and AARP because they would have undermined patient protections for North Dakotans with preexisting conditions, raised premium costs for thousands of families, or eliminated federal funding for North Dakota's bipartisan Medicaid expansion signed by Gov. Jack Dalrymple. The impact on rural health would have been particularly devastating -- ending funding that helped keep hospital doors open in small towns across North Dakota. Kevin Cramer looks at health care through a strictly political lens. Instead of reaching across the aisle and finding solutions, he's taken what he's called 65 "symbolic votes" to repeal or undermine the health care law. President Donald Trump even referred to one of Cramer's health care repeal bills as "mean" because the bill gutted protections for North Dakotans with preexisting conditions. It even placed an "age tax" on North Dakotans ages 50-64 -- allowing insurance companies to charge them up to five times more for care than younger people. With Cramer's health care plan, it's simple -- you'd face higher costs, fewer patient protections, and less comprehensive coverage. Period. I didn't go to the Senate to take "symbolic votes" -- especially not on an issue as important as health care. North Dakotans elected me to find solutions. Folks like Allison, her parents, and moms and dads in every corner of the state are deeply concerned about their access to affordable care. They deserve so much better than what they've gotten from Cramer, who's been more concerned about scoring political points than finding solutions. If you're concerned about health care and looking for a leader who'll work across the aisle to protect families and bring costs down, I'm humbly asking for your vote on Nov. 6.

Events

2018

Nov. 6
Election Night Party with Heidi!

Tue 8:00 PM – 1:00 AM CST

DoubleTree by Hilton West Fargo West Fargo, ND