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Donald Trump

R

Twitter Followers: 83.1M

Running, 2020, Presidential Primary Election

July States
August States

President (2017 - Present)

2019


Quick Facts
Personal Details

Donald Trump is the 45th and current president of the United States. He assumed office on January 20, 2017. He filed to run for re-election on the same day.

Trump is running on an America First platform, which he described in his inaugural address: "Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families. We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies, and destroying our jobs."

In his first two years in office, two U.S. Supreme Court justices were confirmed, the United States withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal, and Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

During his presidency, Trump has issued five vetoes. To read more about these vetoes, .

Trump was born in Queens, New York, in 1946. He attended Fordham University before transferring to the Wharton School of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a B.S. in economics in 1968.

After graduation, Trump joined his family's company, Elizabeth Trump & Son. He took control of the company in 1971 and later renamed it the Trump Organization. He was involved in a variety of real estate and other business ventures in the following years. From 2004 until 2015, Trump hosted and served as executive producer of The Apprentice on NBC.

In 1999, Trump ran as a Reform Party presidential candidate; he withdrew from the race in February 2000. Between 1987 and 2012, he changed his official party affiliation five times, registering most recently as a Republican in April 2012.

Trump declared his candidacy for the 2016 presidential election on June 16, 2015, and officially received the nomination of the Republican Party on July 19, 2016, at the Republican National Convention.

On November 8, 2016, Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States. He received 304 electoral votes to Hillary Clinton's 227.

Real estate

When Trump joined his family’s company, Elizabeth Trump & Son, after college, he urged his father to expand the business in Manhattan. Donald Trump took control of the company in 1971, and he later renamed it the Trump Organization. One of Trump's first purchases in New York City was the Commodore Hotel from the Penn Central Railroad in 1974. In 1980, after six years of renovation, the 34-story Grand Hyatt Hotel opened for business. Trump broke ground on Trump Tower in 1980. The mostly residential, 48-story luxury high-rise opened in 1983.

Atlantic City casinos

In 1984, Trump ventured outside New York City to develop the first of three gambling casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Harrah's at Trump Plaza (later Trump Plaza). A second casino, Trump’s Castle, in Atlantic City’s marina district, opened in 1985. In the late 1980s, Trump took over the construction of a boardwalk hotel and casino: the Taj Mahal. The Trump Taj Mahal, the largest and most expensive casino at the time, opened in April 1990. After 15 months in operation, the Taj filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Trump's casino companies also filed for bankruptcy in 1992, 2004, and 2009. This was a period of decline for Atlantic City casinos due to a slow economy and increased competition in nearby states. Trump Plaza closed in September 2014. Under a bankruptcy restructuring plan, the Taj Mahal remains open under new ownership.

Reality television

Trump hosted and served as executive producer of “The Apprentice” on NBC from 2004 to 2015 when NBC severed all business ties with Trump. The reality television game show tested contestants’ business skills as they competed to become Trump’s apprentice. The show spurred the catch-phrase, “You’re fired!” and inspired the spinoff, “The Celebrity Apprentice.”

Author

Trump is the author of 15 books, including his 1987 memoir, “The Art of the Deal.”

Other business ventures

Trump owns and operates golf courses in California, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Washington, DC, and in Ireland, Scotland, and the United Arab Emirates. He also owns Wollman Rink, New York City’s Central Park ice rink, and Trump Place, a housing development with a 5,700 apartments along the Hudson River. In 1988, Trump bought Eastern Air Shuttle, an airline service that ran hourly flights between Boston, New York City, and Washington, DC, and transformed it into a luxury experience. The shuttle ceased operation in 1992 after Trump was forced to turn it over to creditors. In the mid-2000s, Trump launched his own vodka, premium steaks, and magazine; each was discontinued.

Education

  • Attended, Fordham University
  • BS, Economics/Real Estate, Wharton School of Finance, University of Pennsylvania

Professional Experience

  • Attended, Fordham University
  • BS, Economics/Real Estate, Wharton School of Finance, University of Pennsylvania
  • Former Owner, Miss Universe Organization
  • Former Owner, New Jersey Generals
  • Former Host, "The Celebrity Apprentice"
  • Former Host, "Trumped!"
  • Chair, Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts, Incorporated
  • Former Owner, Trump Shuttle
  • Co-Founder, Trump University
  • Founder/Chair/President/Chief Executive Officer, The Trump Organization, 1975-2017
  • Producer, "The Apprentice", 2004-2015

Political Experience

  • Attended, Fordham University
  • BS, Economics/Real Estate, Wharton School of Finance, University of Pennsylvania
  • Former Owner, Miss Universe Organization
  • Former Owner, New Jersey Generals
  • Former Host, "The Celebrity Apprentice"
  • Former Host, "Trumped!"
  • Chair, Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts, Incorporated
  • Former Owner, Trump Shuttle
  • Co-Founder, Trump University
  • Founder/Chair/President/Chief Executive Officer, The Trump Organization, 1975-2017
  • Producer, "The Apprentice", 2004-2015
  • President, United States of America, 2017-present
  • Candidate, President of the United States of America, 2020

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

  • Attended, Fordham University
  • BS, Economics/Real Estate, Wharton School of Finance, University of Pennsylvania
  • Former Owner, Miss Universe Organization
  • Former Owner, New Jersey Generals
  • Former Host, "The Celebrity Apprentice"
  • Former Host, "Trumped!"
  • Chair, Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts, Incorporated
  • Former Owner, Trump Shuttle
  • Co-Founder, Trump University
  • Founder/Chair/President/Chief Executive Officer, The Trump Organization, 1975-2017
  • Producer, "The Apprentice", 2004-2015
  • President, United States of America, 2017-present
  • Candidate, President of the United States of America, 2020
  • Member, Benefactors Board of Directors, Historical Society of Palm Beach County
  • Member, Board of Directors, Police Athletic League
  • Former Committee Member, Celebration of Nations
  • Founding Member, Committee to Complete Construction of the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine
  • Former Chair, Donald J. Trump Foundation
  • Advisory Board Member, Lenox Hill Hospital
  • Co-Chair, New York Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund
  • Member, Presidents Council of New York University
  • Founding Member, The Wharton School Real Estate Center
  • Advisory Board Member, United Cerebral Palsy
  • Grand Marshal, The Nation's Parade, 1995

Other Info

— Awards:

  • Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, 2007
  • Entrepreneur of the Year, The Wharton School
  • Lifetime Achievement Award, American Cancer Society, 2012
  • Commandant's Leadership Award, Marine Corps--Law Enforcement Foundation, 2015
  • Hotel and Real Estate Visionary of the Century, UJA Federation, 2000
  • Green Space Award, Friends of Westchester County Parks, 2007
  • T. Boone Pickens Award, The American Spectator, Robert L. Bartley Gala

  • 10

— Publications:

  • "Trump: The Art of the Deal"
  • "Trump: The Art of the Comeback"
  • "Trump Never Give Up: How I Turned My Biggest Challenges into Success"
  • "Midas Touch: Why Some Entrepreneurs Get Rich and Why Most Don't"
  • "Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America"
  • "Think Big: Make It Happen in Business and Life"
  • "Trump: Think Like a Billionaire: Everything You Need to Know About Success, Real Estate, and Life"
  • "Trump: How to Get Rich"
  • "Think Like a Champion: An Informal Education In Business and Life"
  • "Trump: The Way to the Top: The Best Business Advice I Ever Received"
  • "Surviving at the Top"
  • "Time to Get Tough: Make America Great Again!"
  • "Trump: The Best Real Estate Advice I Ever Received: 100 Top Experts Share Their Strategies"
  • "Trump 101: The Way to Success"
  • "Trump: The Best Golf Advice I Ever Received"
  • "Why We Want You To Be Rich: Two Men, One Message"

Elections

2020

Presidency

An election for president of the United States will be held on November 3, 2020. Trump filed to run for re-election on January 20, 2017.

2016

Trump won the 2016 presidential election.

U.S. presidential election, 2016

Party Candidate Vote % Votes Electoral votes
Democratic Hillary Clinton/Tim Kaine 48.3% 65,844,969 227
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDonald Trump/Mike Pence 46.2% 62,979,984 304
Libertarian Gary Johnson/Bill Weld 3.3% 4,492,919 0
Green Jill Stein/Ajamu Baraka 1.1% 1,449,370 0
- Other 1.2% 1,684,908 7
Total Votes 136,452,150 538
Election results via:
Note: Trump and Clinton were projected to receive 306 and 232 electoral votes, respectively. Seven electors, however, cast votes for other candidates. Read about what happened here. The results listed above are based on reports from state secretary of state offices and election boards.
Policy Positions

2020

Abortion

Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-life

Budget

1. In order to balance the budget, do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- No

2. Do you support expanding federal funding to support entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare?
- Unknown Position

Education

Do you support requiring states to adopt federal education standards?
- No

Energy & Environment

1. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- No

2. Do you support government funding for the development of renewable energy (e.g. solar, wind, geo-thermal)?
- Yes

Guns

Do you generally support gun-control legislation?
- Unknown Position

Health Care

Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")?
- Yes

Campaign Finance

Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Unknown Position

Economy

1. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

2. Do you support lowering corporate taxes as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

Immigration

1. Do you support the construction of a wall along the Mexican border?
- Yes

2. Do you support requiring immigrants who are unlawfully present to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- Yes

National Security

1. Should the United States use military force to prevent governments hostile to the U.S. from possessing a weapon of mass destruction (for example: nuclear, biological, chemical)?
- Unknown Position

2. Do you support reducing military intervention in Middle East conflicts?
- No

Trade

Do you generally support removing barriers to international trade (for example: tariffs, quotas, etc.)?
- Unknown Position

Defense

Do you support increasing defense spending?
- Yes

Endorsements
George Kirn endorsed
Greatest man for America ever! President Trump has my vote
Articles

Attorney General William Barr defends Justice Department against claims of politicization

Jul. 10, 2020

Attorney General William Barr offered a forceful defense of the Justice Department's independence on Wednesday amid criticism that its work has been leveraged as a political tool for President Donald Trump. "Where independence is most important and, in fact, essential is in the administration of criminal justice -- the decisions to charge people or not charge people," Barr said in an exclusive interview with ABC News. "I'd like to hear some examples of people we've charged that they think were unrighteous cases to bring," he added. "And I haven't seen any specifics on that." During his tenure as the nation's chief law enforcement official, Barr has overseen several high-profile investigations, including multiple cases tied to the president's 2016 campaign and subsequent investigation led by special counsel Robert Mueller. Since taking office nearly a year-and-a-half ago, Barr has perpetually faced criticism from those who say he has politicized his role. That criticism dates back to his handling of the Mueller probe’s conclusion, including the rollout of the special counsel’s report. Congressional Democrats and former Justice Department officials have at times called for his resignation or impeachment, citing misuse of his office for political errands. Perhaps most notably, the attorney general has drawn particularly strong scrutiny for his intervention in the government's case against Michael Flynn, the president's first national security adviser. In 2017, Mueller charged Flynn with one count of lying to federal investigators. Though he twice pleaded guilty to the charge, the Justice Department dropped its case in May after Barr assigned a U.S. attorney to investigate the genesis of the government's case. "[The U.S. attorney] came back and said that he didn't think anyone in the department would prosecute that case or charge that case," Barr said. "And in fact, the documents that have recently been released indicate that the FBI felt that he had not lied. And this was not, as later spun, that he didn't show signs of lying," Barr continued. "They said they didn't think he lied. That he believed what he was saying was true. And there are a number of other facts there that made us feel that that was not a case that met our standards of prosecution."Former U.S. national security adviser Michael Flynn passes by members of the media as he departs after his sentencing was delayed at U.S. District Court in Washington, Dec. 18, 2018. Joshua Roberts/Reuters, File Pressed on why then Flynn twice pleaded guilty, Barr declined to speculate. In May, more than 2,000 former federal prosecutors called on Barr to resign over what they described as his improper intervention into Flynn's case. Barr also reacted to the case of former campaign adviser to Trump, political operative Roger Stone, who in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison after he was found guilty in November of obstructing justice, witness tampering and five counts of lying to Congress. Barr reiterated that he thought Stone's prosecution was "righteous," and defended his decision to object to a stricter sentence for Stone, which he called "excessive." In recent weeks, Stone has publicly advocated for presidential intervention ahead of his scheduled arrival in custody. The longtime political operative has flooded social media in recent weeks expressing concern over his own health if sent to prison, citing the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. On Twitter, Trump has fueled speculation that a pardon or commutation of Stone's sentence may be in the works, retweeting a message, "IT'S TIME TO #PardonRogerStone." Barr said a prospective intervention is "the president's prerogative." "It's a unique power that the president has," he added. "And it's certainly something that is committed to his judgment. But as I say, I felt it was an appropriate prosecution and I thought the sentence was fair."ABC's Pierre Thomas interviews Attorney General William Barr, July 8, 2020. Luke Barr/ABC News More recently, Barr has faced criticism for the dismissal of Geoffrey Berman as U.S. attorney in the powerful Southern District of New York. In statement last month, issued late on a Friday, Barr announced Berman had decided to step down from his position to make way for the president's official nominee for the post, outgoing SEC Commissioner Jay Clayton. Barr also sought to install the US attorney for New Jersey, Craig Carpenito, to replace Berman until Clayton's confirmation, but Berman contradicted Barr saying he never planned to step down. After a period of uncertainty as to how the matter would be resolved, Barr instead moved to fire Berman and handed over control of the office to his immediate deputy, Audrey Strauss. "This was not a question of removing him because of any deficiency on his part," Barr said. Berman's removal came two years into a tenure that included the prosecution of Michael Cohen, the arrest of Jeffrey Epstein and charges filed against two associates of Rudy Giuliani at the heart of the Ukraine impeachment inquiry. Barr said it would be "ludicrous" to suggest that Berman was removed as a result of any ongoing investigation under his watch. "Anyone who knows the department knows that, even if one were interested in trying to influence a case, you wouldn't do it by removing the head of the office," Barr said. "That's simply not how the Southern District of New York or the department as a whole operates. So it's actually ludicrous and I felt it was just simply not a plausible basis for not making a change there." Berman is slated to appear before the House of Representatives on Thursday.Source: https://abcnews.go.com/

Supreme Court blocks House Dem subpoenas for Trump financial records

Jul. 10, 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday blocked subpoenas from congressional Democrats for President Donald Trump's personal and business financial records but kept open the possibility that they could ultimately be enforced. Chief Justice John Roberts, in a 7-2 opinion, reversed a lower court decision upholding four congressional subpoenas for the records, saying that it failed to adequately account for "weighty concerns regarding the separation of powers." Roberts returned the case to lower courts for a reexamination of the subpoenas in light of those concerns. He did not rule out the possibility that the House subpoenas could be enforced in the future, but delayed, for now, the prospect that the documents will be turned over to Democrats before the November election.President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn after arriving on Marine One at the White House in Washington, June 25, 2020. Alex Brandon/AP, FILE Three Democratic-led House committees have sought a sweeping array of Trump personal and business financial records -- more than 10 years worth, many predating his time in the White House -- including financial statements, loan engagement letters, bank statements, credit card statements, personal checks, loan applications and tax returns. The lawmakers have said the information is critical to drafting federal ethics laws concerning the presidency, anti-corruption legislation and campaign finance rules. They are also continuing to pursue possible improper financial ties between Trump and Russia. "We have never addressed a congressional subpoena for the president's information," Roberts writes. "We have held that each house has power to secure needed information in order to legislate," he said, affirming the power of Congress to legitimately subpoena the president. At the same time, the Roberts concluded that power is not unchecked: "Without limits on its subpoena powers, Congress could exert an imperious control over the executive branch and aggrandize itself at the president's expense, just as the framers feared." Roberts, deliberately not invalidating the subpoenas, said a lower could would need to perform additional "careful analysis" using criteria laid out in his opinion to determine whether or not they serve "significant legislative interests of Congress" and respect the unique burdens of the presidency. Justices Thomas and Alito dissented. "Congress' legislative powers do not authorize it to engage in a nationwide inquisition with whatever resources it chooses to appropriate for itself," Thomas wrote. "The power that Congress seeks to exercise here has even less basis in the Constitution that the majority supposes."A police officer walks outside the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., July 6, 2020. Patrick Semansky/AP President Trump's legal team called the ruling -- along with a decision in a related case on a New York grand jury subpoena -- a legal victory. "We are pleased that in the decisions issued today, the Supreme Court has temporarily blocked both Congress and New York prosecutors from obtaining the President’s tax records. We will now proceed to raise additional Constitutional and legal issues in the lower courts," Counsel to the President Kay Sekulow said in a statement. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, seizing on Roberts' affirmation of Congress' subpoena power, cast the decision as a victory for congressional oversight of the president. "A careful reading of the Supreme Court rulings related to the President’s financial records is not good news for President Trump," Pelosi said in a statement. “The Court has reaffirmed the Congress’s authority to conduct oversight on behalf of the American people, as it asks for further information from the Congress." "We will continue to press our case in the lower courts,” she added. House Democrats face protracted litigation, which could potentially return to the Supreme Court, over the scope of their subpoenas and implications on the separation of powers. The lengthy process all but guarantees the committees will not receive the documents before the fall election. "An important win today for the pillars of separation of powers and federalism," tweeted Carrie Severino, president of the Judicial Crisis Network, a conservative legal advocacy group. "These values are at the very heart of our Constitutional structure, and today they were upheld in a 7-2 opinion authored by the Chief Justice." In a separate but related case handed down just minutes before, Roberts, writing for a 7-2 majority, said Trump did not have absolute immunity from subpoenas for his tax returns and other financial records sought by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance in a grand jury investigation. "The conventional wisdom that this would be a split decision held: the president doesn’t have absolute immunity from state grand jury subpoenas but Congress doesn’t have carte blanche to engage in a fishing expedition against the chief executive," said Ilya Shapiro, a constitutional scholar with the Cato Institute. "Both cases will now continue, and won’t ultimately be resolved until after the election." Source: https://abcnews.go.com/

Fired US attorney Geoffrey Berman appears before Congress

Jul. 10, 2020

Geoffrey Berman, the former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York fired by President Donald Trump, told House lawmakers on Thursday that Attorney General Bill Barr repeatedly asked him to resign in a private meeting before his removal, and warned that his firing could damage his reputation. “The Attorney General said that if I did not resign from my position I would be fired,” Berman said in an opening statement to the House Judiciary Committee obtained by ABC News. “He added that getting fired from my job would not be good for my resume or future job prospects.”Former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Geoffrey Berman arrives for a closed door interview before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 9, 2020. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters “I told him that while I did not want to get fired, I would not resign,” he said, adding that the effort to replace him "would have been unprecedented, unnecessary and unexplained." The account – shared with lawmakers as part of their investigation into Berman’s firing and the politicization of the Justice Department -- raises new questions about the extraordinary June standoff between one of the nation’s most prominent federal prosecutors and the attorney general. On Friday, June 19, Barr announced that Berman had resigned, and would be replaced by the U.S. attorney in New Jersey in an acting capacity until the Senate confirmed Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Jay Clayton for the post. Berman fired back in a statement of his own, denying that he had resigned and claiming that he had learned of the change from the Justice Department’s press release. The standoff eventually led President Trump to formally fire Berman, and replace him with his deputy, Audrey Strauss. In his statement to lawmakers, Berman said that Barr was not unhappy with his performance, and only said he wanted him to step down from the post “because the Administration wanted to get Jay Clayton into that position.” “I told the Attorney General that there were important investigations in the Office that I wanted to see through to completion,” he said. Barr and the administration faced intense criticism over Berman’s removal, given the number of high profile and politically-sensitive investigations he supervised at the Southern District. Under his leadership, the office prosecuted the president’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, and continues to investigate Trump personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani. The Southern District of New York has also investigated fundraising for the president’s inauguration, and Giuliani associates Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, who, like the former New York City mayor, featured in events related to Trump’s impeachment. Parnas and Fruman were charged with campaign finance violations in October 2019. Democrats are investigating what they say is a pattern of actions from Barr and the Justice Department that are overtly political and in service of the president’s personal interests. In June, the committee heard testimony from two whistleblowers who alleged that Justice Department leadership inappropriately intervened in typically-sensitive law enforcement matters – related to the sentencing of Trump ally Roger Stone, and antitrust investigations into the marijuana industry - for political reasons and to benefit Trump's interests. Democrats plan to release a transcript of the interview with Berman in the coming weeks. Barr, in an interview with ABC News on Wednesday, said Berman’s firing “was not a question of removing him because of any deficiency on his part,” and said it was “ludicrous” to suggest that the move was an effort to exert influence over the office’s investigations. “Anyone who knows the department knows that even if one were interested in trying to influence a case you wouldn't do it by removing the head of the office,” he said. “That's simply not how the Southern District of New York or the department as a whole operates,” he continued. “So it's actually ludicrous, and I felt it was just simply not a plausible basis for not making a change there. Barr is scheduled to testify before the panel on July 28. ABC News' Katherine Faulders contributed to this report. ISource: https://abcnews.go.com/