Share on WeChat
https://www.powervoter.us/ernest_reeves
Copy the link and open WeChat to share.
 Share on WeChat
Copy the link and open WeChat to share.
 Share on WeChat
Scan QRCode using WeChat,and then click the icon at the top-right corner of your screen.
 Share on WeChat
Scan QRCode using WeChat,and then click the icon at the top-right corner of your screen.

Ernest Reeves

D
Personal Details

Ernest Reeves (Nonpartisan) is a candidate for Ward 2 member of the Greenville City Council in North Carolina. Reeves is running in the general election on November 5, 2019.

Reeves was a 2019 Democratic candidate for North Carolina's 3rd Congressional District in the U.S. House. Reeves lost the primary on April 30, 2019.

Elections

2019

Greenville City Council

General election
General election for Greenville City Council Ward 2

Incumbent Rose Glover, John Landrine, and Ernest Reeves are running in the general election for Greenville City Council Ward 2 on November 5, 2019.

Candidate

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Rose Glover (Nonpartisan)

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

John Landrine (Nonpartisan)

Ernest Reeves (Nonpartisan)

U.S. House

General election
Special general election for U.S. House North Carolina District 3

Gregory Murphy (R) defeated Allen Thomas (D), Greg Holt (Constitution Party), and Tim Harris (L) in the special general election for U.S. House North Carolina District 3 on September 10, 2019.

Candidate
%
Votes

Gregory Murphy (R)
61.7
70,142

Allen Thomas (D)
37.5
42,570

Greg Holt (Constitution Party)
0.4
502

Tim Harris (L)
0.3
393

Total votes: 113,607
Primary runoff election
Special Republican primary runoff for U.S. House North Carolina District 3

Gregory Murphy defeated Joan Perry in the special Republican primary runoff for U.S. House North Carolina District 3 on July 9, 2019.

Candidate
%
Votes

Gregory Murphy (R)
59.7
21,444

Joan Perry (R)
40.3
14,472

Total votes: 35,916
Democratic primary election
Special Democratic primary for U.S. House North Carolina District 3

The following candidates ran in the special Democratic primary for U.S. House North Carolina District 3 on April 30, 2019.

Candidate
%
Votes

Allen Thomas (D)
50.0
12,883

Richard Bew (D)
25.2
6,502

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Dana Outlaw (D)
12.6
3,256

Isaiah Johnson (D)
6.8
1,760

Gregory Humphrey (D)
2.7
686

Ernest Reeves (D)
2.6
681

Total votes: 25,768
Republican primary election
Special Republican primary for U.S. House North Carolina District 3

The following candidates ran in the special Republican primary for U.S. House North Carolina District 3 on April 30, 2019.

Candidate
%
Votes

Gregory Murphy (R)
22.5
9,505

Joan Perry (R)
15.4
6,510

Phillip Shepard (R)
12.0
5,082

Michael Speciale (R)
9.5
4,009

Phil Law (R)
8.7
3,683

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Eric Rouse (R)
7.7
3,251

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Jeff Moore (R)
5.4
2,277

Francis De Luca (R)
3.9
1,664

Celeste Cairns (R)
3.5
1,462

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Chimer Davis Clark Jr. (R)
2.6
1,087

Michele Nix (R)
2.2
909

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Graham Boyd (R)
2.1
895

Paul Beaumont (R)
1.8
776

Mike Payment (R)
1.3
537

Don Cox (R)
0.6
251

Kevin Baiko (R)
0.4
170

Gary Ceres (R)
0.3
107

Total votes: 42,175
Libertarian primary election
Special Libertarian primary for U.S. House North Carolina District 3

Tim Harris defeated Shannon Bray in the special Libertarian primary for U.S. House North Carolina District 3 on April 30, 2019.

Candidate
%
Votes

Tim Harris (L)
56.4
75

Shannon Bray (L)
43.6
58

Total votes: 133

2018

General election
General election for North Carolina House of Representatives District 8

Kandie Smith (D) defeated Brenda Smith (R) in the general election for North Carolina House of Representatives District 8 on November 6, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Kandie Smith (D)
64.6
15,570

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Brenda Smith (R)
35.4
8,515

Total votes: 24,085
Democratic primary election
Democratic primary for North Carolina House of Representatives District 8

Kandie Smith defeated Mildred Council and Ernest Reeves in the Democratic primary for North Carolina House of Representatives District 8 on May 8, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Kandie Smith (D)
50.0
2,791

Mildred Council (D)
35.6
1,988

Ernest Reeves (D)
14.3
799

Total votes: 5,578
Republican primary election
Republican primary for North Carolina House of Representatives District 8

Brenda Smith advanced from the Republican primary for North Carolina House of Representatives District 8 on May 8, 2018.

Candidate

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Brenda Smith (R)


2016

House

rated this race as safely Republican. Incumbent Walter Jones (R) defeated Democratic candidate Ernest Reeves in the general election. Jones defeated Taylor Griffin and Phil Law in the Republican primary, while Reeves defeated David Hurst for the Democratic nomination. The primary election took place on June 7, 2016. The general election took place on November 8, 2016.

U.S. House, North Carolina District 3 General Election, 2016
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngWalter Jones Incumbent 67.2% 217,531
Democratic Ernest Reeves 32.8% 106,170
Total Votes 323,701
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections

U.S. House, North Carolina District 3 Republican Primary, 2016
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngWalter Jones Incumbent 64.9% 15,799
Phil Law 20.3% 4,946
Taylor Griffin 14.8% 3,610
Total Votes 24,355
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections

U.S. House, North Carolina District 3 Democratic Primary, 2016
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngErnest Reeves 54.7% 6,456
David Hurst 45.3% 5,351
Total Votes 11,807
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections

Senate

The race for North Carolina's U.S. Senate seat was one of nine competitive battleground races in 2016 that helped Republicans maintain control of the upper chamber after the November 8 general election. Incumbent Sen. Richard Burr (R) won re-election, defeating former state Rep. Deborah Ross (D) and pizza delivery driver Sean Haugh (L) in the general election.

While most of his colleagues facing tough re-election campaigns were out on the trail, Burr, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, was focused on his duties as chairman and did not officially begin campaigning until October 7, 2016. He told The Associated Press, “I become a candidate on Oct. 7, when the United States Senate is adjourned. I don't want there to be any question between the separation of Senate business, so I have very few conversations with campaigns and it really plays no role in my actions." Some Republican strategists were worried that Burr’s failure to attack Ross early in the race would hurt him on Election Day, while others said “Burr’s low-key style fits the ethos of the state well.”

Republican President-elect Donald Trump, who did not establish a strong ground game in the state, and North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory (R), who was unpopular because of his stance on the state’s “bathroom bill,” complicated Burr’s path to re-election. Referring to Trump and McCrory, North Carolina GOP consultant Carter Wrenn said, “If it was a normal year, and it was just Richard and Deborah, you’d have to say Richard had a solid advantage.”

With the uncertain political landscape in North Carolina—it was the only state that The Cook Political Report rated as a “toss-up” for president, Senate, and governor—outside Republican groups spent more money on attack ads in the state than they had initially planned for in an effort to maintain control of the Senate. The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) ran ads attacking Ross for being "too liberal" for North Carolina by highlighting her career with the American Civil Liberties Union. The NRSC also created the site “Radical Ross” to showcase Ross’ stance on “countless radical, out-of-touch policies.”

Ross’s campaign spokesman Cole Leiter, who attempted to portray Burr as a Washington insider, responded to the attacks saying, “It’s no surprise that, like a typical Washington politician, [Burr]’s turning to the same big money donors he’s put first all along. But North Carolina voters won’t be fooled — they know it’s time for a change, and no amount of special interest dark money can bail Richard Burr out.”

Ultimately, Burr was not hurt by his late arrival to the campaign trail or by having Trump or McCrory on the ballot. Burr outperformed Trump by earning more votes than the president-elect. After winning re-election, Burr tweeted: “Thank you North Carolina! Honored to continue serving as your senator.”

U.S. Senate, North Carolina General Election, 2016
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Burr Incumbent 51.1% 2,395,376
Democratic Deborah Ross 45.4% 2,128,165
Libertarian Sean Haugh 3.6% 167,592
Total Votes 4,691,133
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections

U.S. Senate Republican Primary, 2016
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Burr Incumbent 61.4% 627,354
Greg Brannon 25.2% 257,331
Paul Wright 8.5% 86,940
Larry Holmquist 4.9% 50,507
Total Votes 1,022,132
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections
U.S. Senate Democratic Primary, 2016
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDeborah Ross 62.4% 607,802
Chris Rey 16.5% 160,663
Kevin Griffin 11.7% 114,180
Ernest Reeves 9.4% 91,694
Total Votes 974,339
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections

2014

Reeves ran in the 2014 election for the U.S. Senate, to represent North Carolina. Reeves sought the Democratic nomination in the primary on May 6, 2014, but was defeated by incumbent Kay Hagan.

U.S. Senate, North Carolina Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngKay Hagan Incumbent 77.2% 372,209
Will Stewart 13.9% 66,903
Ernest Reeves 9% 43,257
Total Votes 482,369
Source: Results via the North Carolina State Board of Elections