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John Delaney

D

2019


Congress Bills
Quick Facts
Personal Details

John Delaney (b. April 16, 1963, in Wood-Ridge, NJ) is a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate. On July 28, 2017, Delaney announced that he would run for president rather than seek re-election to his House seat in 2018.

He is a former Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives representing Maryland's 6th Congressional District. Delaney was first elected to the House on November 6, 2012.

Delaney suspended his presidential campaign on January 31, 2020.

Prior to his congressional career, Delaney founded two New York Stock Exchange companies, as well as Blueprint Maryland, a nonprofit organization focused on the creation of jobs in Maryland's private sector.

Delaney was born in 1963 and grew up in Wood-Ridge, New Jersey. His father was a union electrician, and Delaney has credited scholarships from the union and other community organizations with allowing him to attend Columbia University. He graduated with a B.S. from Columbia in 1985 and went on to receive a J.D. from Georgetown University in 1988.

After graduating from Georgetown, Delaney worked as a lawyer at Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge. From 1990 to 1992, he co-owned and ran a healthcare firm, and in 1993, he co-founded HealthCare Financial Partners, a publicly-traded company that provided loans to healthcare companies. In 2000, Delaney co-founded another publicly-traded lending company, CapitalSource. He was named an Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year in 2004. Delaney founded Blueprint Maryland, a nonprofit organization focused on economic development and job creation, in 2011.

On November 6, 2012, Delaney defeated incumbent Roscoe Bartlett (R) for Maryland's 6th Congressional District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was re-elected in 2014 and 2016. Delaney did not run for re-election in 2018.

In 2018, he published a book titled, The Right Answer: How We Can Unify Our Divided Nation.

Below is an abbreviated outline of Delaney's academic, professional, and political career:

  • 2013-2019: U.S. Representative from Maryland's 6th Congressional District
  • 2011: Founded Blueprint Maryland
  • 2000: Founded CapitalSource
  • 1993: Founded Healthcare Financial Partners

Education

  • JD, Georgetown University Law Center, 1988
  • BS, Columbia University, 1985

Professional Experience

  • JD, Georgetown University Law Center, 1988
  • BS, Columbia University, 1985
  • Founder/Co-Chief Executive Officer, Alliance Partners, 2011-present
  • Founder/Chair Emeritus, CapitalSource, 2000-present
  • Chair/Chief Executive Officer, HealthCare Financial Partners, 1993-1999

Political Experience

  • JD, Georgetown University Law Center, 1988
  • BS, Columbia University, 1985
  • Founder/Co-Chief Executive Officer, Alliance Partners, 2011-present
  • Founder/Chair Emeritus, CapitalSource, 2000-present
  • Chair/Chief Executive Officer, HealthCare Financial Partners, 1993-1999
  • Candidate, President of the United States, 2020
  • Representative, United States House of Representatives, District 6, 2012-2019

Former Committees/Caucuses

Former Member, Financial Services Committee, United States House of Representatives

Former Member, Joint Economic Committee, United States House of Representatives

Former Member, Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit, United States House of Representatives

Former Member, Subcommittee on Housing and Insurance, United States House of Representatives

Former Member, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigators, United States House of Representatives

Former Member, Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance, United States House of Representatives

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

  • JD, Georgetown University Law Center, 1988
  • BS, Columbia University, 1985
  • Founder/Co-Chief Executive Officer, Alliance Partners, 2011-present
  • Founder/Chair Emeritus, CapitalSource, 2000-present
  • Chair/Chief Executive Officer, HealthCare Financial Partners, 1993-1999
  • Candidate, President of the United States, 2020
  • Representative, United States House of Representatives, District 6, 2012-2019
  • Founder/Chair, Blueprint Maryland, 2011-present
  • Member, Board of Trustees, Potomac School, present
  • Member, Little Flower Parish, Bethesda, present
  • Former Board Member, Boys & Girls Clubs of America
  • Founder, Delaney Family Professorship, Georgetown University
  • Member, Executive Committee, Board of Directors, Georgetown University
  • Former Member, Board of Directors, International Center for Research on Women
  • Former Member, National Advisory Council of Bridges of Understanding
  • Member, Board of Directors, National Symphony Orchestra
  • Former Chair, Saint Patrick’s Episcopal Day School Board
  • Former Mentor, Visible Men

Other Info

— Awards:

  • Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Winner, 2005
  • Outstanding Philanthropists, 2007

Spouse's Occupation:

Attorney, education and children's advocate

Elections

2020

Presidency

An election for president of the United States will be held on November 3, 2020. Delaney filed to run for president on August 10, 2017. He suspended his campaign on January 31, 2020.

2018

John Delaney did not file to run for re-election.

2016

rated this race as safely Democratic. In Maryland's 6th Congressional District, incumbent John Delaney (D) defeated Amie Hoeber (R), David Howser, George Gluck (G), and Ted Athey (Write-in) in the general election on November 8, 2016. Delaney defeated Tony Puca in the Democratic primary, while Hoeber defeated seven other Republican challengers to win the Republican nomination. The primary elections took place on April 26, 2016.

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 General Election, 2016

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney Incumbent 56% 185,770
Republican Amie Hoeber 40.1% 133,081
Libertarian David Howser 2.1% 6,889
Green George Gluck 1.8% 5,824
N/A Write-in 0.1% 409
Total Votes 331,973
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 Democratic Primary, 2016

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney Incumbent 84.9% 69,343
Tony Puca 15.1% 12,317
Total Votes 81,660
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 Republican Primary, 2016

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAmie Hoeber 29.3% 17,967
Terry Baker 22.6% 13,837
Frank Howard 17.4% 10,677
Robin Ficker 11.4% 7,014
David Vogt 9.4% 5,774
Christopher Mason 4.2% 2,590
Scott Cheng 3.8% 2,303
Harold Painter 1.8% 1,117
Total Votes 61,279
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections

2014

Delaney ran for re-election in Maryland's 6th Congressional District in the general election on November 4, 2014. He ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination in the primary on June 24, 2014. The general election took place on November 4, 2014.

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 General Election, 2014

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney Incumbent 49.7% 94,704
Republican Dan Bongino 48.2% 91,930
Green George Gluck 2% 3,762
Write-in Others 0.1% 140
Total Votes 190,536
Source: Maryland Secretary of State Official Results

He addressed rumors of a possible gubernatorial bid on January 25, 2015.

“Many people I trust and respect have asked me to consider running for governor, and of course I always think about where I may best serve,” Delaney said. “But I love my job, and my expectation is that I will continue to serve in Congress and represent my district.”

2012

Delaney ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House to represent Maryland's 6th District. He defeated Milad Pooran, Robert Garagiola, Charles Bailey, and Ron Little in the Democratic primary on April 3, 2012. He defeated incumbent Roscoe Bartlett (R) and Nickolaus Mueller (L) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run was January 11, 2012.

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 General Election, 2012

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney 58.8% 181,921
Republican Roscoe Bartlett Incumbent 37.9% 117,313
Libertarian Nickolaus Mueller 3.2% 9,916
N/A Other Write-ins 0.1% 399
Total Votes 309,549
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections "Representative in Congress"

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 Democratic Primary, 2012

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney 54.2% 20,414
Charles Bailey 4.2% 1,572
Rob Garagiola 29.1% 10,981
Ron Little 3% 1,131
Milad Pooran 9.5% 3,590
Total Votes 37,688
Policy Positions

Presidential Election 2020 Political Courage Test

Abortion

1. Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-choice

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Budget

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. In order to balance the budget, do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- Yes

3. Do you support expanding federal funding to support entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare?
- Yes

Education

1. Do you support requiring states to adopt federal education standards?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- Every state will need to meet high standards to make our public school system as strong as possible and provide every student with a high-quality education, but I believe it is important that states maintain some flexibility to design their own curriculums.

Energy & Environment

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- Yes

3. Do you support government funding for the development of renewable energy (e.g. solar, wind, geo-thermal)?
- Yes

Guns

1. Do you generally support gun-control legislation?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Health Care

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")?
- No

Campaign Finance

1. Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Economy

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

3. Do you support lowering corporate taxes as a means of promoting economic growth?
- No

Immigration

1. Other or expanded principles
- I support funding for border security, which could include physical barriers, if experts say it is necessary.

2. Do you support the construction of a wall along the Mexican border?
- No

3. Do you support requiring immigrants who are unlawfully present to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- No

National Security

1. Other or expanded principles
- The United States should use military force only as a last resort and instead focus on diplomatic and economic tools to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction to begin with.

2. Should the United States use military force to prevent governments hostile to the U.S. from possessing a weapon of mass destruction (for example: nuclear, biological, chemical)?
- Yes

3. Do you support reducing military intervention in Middle East conflicts?
- Yes

Administrative Priorities

Please explain in a total of 100 words or less, your top two or three priorities if elected. If they require additional funding for implementation, please explain how you would obtain this funding.
- As president, I would focus on passing my climate change, infrastructure, and trade agendas. My $4 trillion climate plan includes a carbon fee and dividend, increased investment in basic research and negative emissions technology, the creation of a Climate Corps, and building a Carbon Throughway to transport captured carbon for reuse and permanent sequestration. My infrastructure plan includes the creation of an infrastructure bank, an increase in the Highway Trust Fund, and new matching funds to focus on specific infrastructure needs. Lastly, I would reject Trump's isolationist ideology and reenage in rules-based trade, including rejoining the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Trade

1. Do you generally support removing barriers to international trade (for example: tariffs, quotas, etc.)?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Defense

1. Do you support increasing defense spending?
- Unknown Position

2. Other or expanded principles
- It would be irresponsible to promise changes to the national security budget absent a full evaluation of threats and challenges facing the United States in the future. Before setting a budget for the Department of Defense, we need to reassess what we are asking our military to do and ensure they have the resources needed to successfully accomplish the mission. As threats continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, the U.S. Armed Forces need to be able to adapt and make the necessary investments. If we underinvest in our national security, it will leave the U.S. vulnerable.

2019

Afghanistan

Would you commit to the full withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of your first term, or would you require certain conditions be met before doing so?

- When Congress passed the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) in September 2001 after the terrorist attacks on September 11th, the mission was clear in its purpose, to hold accountable those who attacked the United States, and those who harbored the terrorists. Eighteen years later, we are still in Afghanistan, but the mission has since been muddled. Congress needs to pass a new AUMF to update and clarify the mission of U.S. forces. While I support dramatically reducing the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, I presently do not believe that a full withdrawal is in our best interests and therefore I envision keeping a small contingency of U.S. forces with a specific focus to train and support local security forces.

Trade

1. Under what circumstances, if any, would you support the United States joining the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), formerly the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

- I would seek to reenter the TPP on day one of my administration. In response to the emergence of China as a dominant economic power on the international stage – which does not always adhere to accepted trade and economic norms and rules – 12 leading Pacific Rim countries reached agreement on a set of protocols for a rules-based trade deal covering 40% of the global economy to counter Chinese economic misconduct. I was one of a handful of Democrats who voted in favor of Trade Promotion Authority to give President Obama the ability to effectively negotiate TPP because I felt we needed a strong strategic response to China. I believed that the United States alone could not stand against China, that it would take a multilateral and strategic effort to counter China. The Trump Administration has abandoned this approach in favor of a trade war with China, a trade war that has had a serious negative impact on hard working Americans and several sectors of the United States economy.

China

How, if at all, should China’s treatment of the Uighurs and the situation in Hong Kong affect broader U.S. policy toward China?

- It is critical that United States foreign policy be based on a solid foundation of moral principles; that foundation is what has always distinguished the U.S. on the world stage. Within that context, we must place a high priority on defending human rights of all people globally and when confronted with human rights abuses by countries with whom we have relations, we must make the resolution of those abuses an important part of our engagement with that country. There should be no exception to this bedrock foundational policy, not in China, not anywhere and the well documented abuses by the Chinese government that are occurring with respect to the Uighurs demand a U.S. and global response. My administration would work closely with appropriate United Nations agencies – and the U.S. Congress - to investigate human rights abuses which have been committed against the Uighur people. I would place this issue front and center in diplomatic discussions with the Chinese government and would urge them to accord human rights protections to all peoples under their domain. With regard to Hong Kong, while I respect the Chinese government's right to govern within its borders, I will voice strong support for Hong Kong's right to autonomy awarded to the city by its status as a special administration region. Hong Kong's ability to manage its own affairs is important to U.S. policy since thousands of U.S. businesses operate out of Hong Kong because of the economic and political protections.

Iran

Would you rejoin the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA)? What changes to the existing agreement, if any, would you require before agreeing to rejoin the accord?

- Yes, I would rejoin, but I would insist on a longer duration. The JCPOA was the best arrangement that six of the leading nations in the world, plus the European Union, could reach to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. At the time the Trump Administration withdrew from the JCPOA, Iran was in compliance with the terms. U.S. withdrawal has become a provocation for the Iranians to not feel constrained to abide by the JCPOA, which has made the situation with Iran inherently more dangerous. The most significant weakness of the JCPOA was the tenor- it was not long enough in duration to provide hope for a successor Iranian regime to confirm long-term compliance. I would seek a longer term - 20 years - as a condition for rejoining the JCPOA. In addition, I would make clear to the Iranians that, while the JCPOA does not address Iranian ICBM developments or Iranian complicity in terrorist activities, the United States will independently of the nuclear deal take strong measures to respond to any such conduct. Iran is a bad actor, and the JCPOA with a longer duration is an important part of eliminating the threat that Iran can possess a nuclear weapon, a situation that must not be accepted.

North Korea

Would you sign an agreement with North Korea that entailed partial sanctions relief in exchange for some dismantling of its nuclear weapons program but not full denuclearization?

- It is impossible to predict what agreements could be in the best interests of our national security, and that of our allies, short of a full denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. As president, I will always consider options that best serve our national security interest. Negotiations with North Korea seeking to achieve nuclear disarmament have been one of the most challenging issues facing successive U.S. administrations for decades. Progress will be incremental, and we need to be patient yet firm in our approach to this relationship. Direct negotiations with North Korea are essential to achieving agreement on the important issues surrounding nuclear disarmament and normalizing relations. While we must be clear that our ultimate objective will be full denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, we should be willing to accept a meaningful and verifiable agreement that takes steps towards denuclearization. We must make clear the path towards our ultimate goal and be steadfast in demanding verified progress before we roll back sanctions. I fear the Trump Administration may agree to removing sanctions against empty measures on the part of North Korea.

Ukraine

What, if any, steps would you take to counter Russian aggression against Ukraine?

- The United States should take a leading role in demanding Russia’s return to its established borders. I would provide leadership within NATO to deliver a unified message to Moscow that such aggression will not be tolerated. I would engage with elected Ukrainian leaders to support their efforts to push Russia back, including military aide, training and support as appropriate. Russian aggression against Ukraine has become a lost issue since the beginning of the Trump Administration. President Putin has led Russia with an antagonistic and predatory foreign policy, including the invasion into the Ukraine and annexation of Crimea, which are unacceptable. I would not walk away from this challenge as the Trump Administration has done. I would also pursue targeted sanctions against Russian interests to drive this point home.

Saudi Arabia

Given the assassination of Jamal Khashoggi and Saudi Arabia’s involvement in the civil war in Yemen, what changes, if any, would you make to U.S. policy toward Saudi Arabia?

- The assassination of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocious act and should cause a reset in our overall relationship with Saudi Arabia. I would demand a clearer accounting than what we have received to date from the Saudi government. While I would not completely cut ties and would continue to do essential business with the country, I would not receive any Saudi official in the White House, and I would not extend high-level U.S. official visits to Saudi Arabia. I would impress upon Saudi officials the importance of respecting human rights at home and abroad. Additionally, I support ending U.S. military support to Saudi Arabia for the purpose of carrying out their military operations in Yemen. My approach to foreign policy will include protection of journalists, wherever they may serve.

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Do you support a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and, if so, how would you go about trying to achieve it?

- I do support a two-state solution but do not think it should be the position of the U.S. to predetermine what that agreement looks like. The only way that lasting peace can be achieved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is if there are direct, bilateral negotiations between the two parties. The U.S. president can and should be a facilitator and mediator in helping parties come to an agreement, which we have seen done successfully in the past. To help achieve a successful agreement between the Israelis and Palestinians, the U.S. can work with regional partners including Egypt and Jordan to provide stability in the conflict. This includes providing Israel – one of our most important and enduring allies - with the necessary resources to defend themselves while also providing humanitarian aid to the Palestinian population to promote human development and humanitarian services such as education and medical services in ways that reach the people directly.

Venezuela

What, if any, additional steps should the United States take to remove Nicolás Maduro from power in Venezuela?

- It is up to the people of Venezuela to decide who will lead their government. I support the elevation of Juan Guaidó to president following the Venezuelan constitution and will continue to speak out in favor of his leadership. I would not, however, favor any direct intervention in Venezuelan power struggles by the United States, but do support our approach to sanctions. I would provide substantial humanitarian support via USAID and through our participation in multilateral agencies such as the OAS and InterAmerican Development Bank.

Africa

By 2050, Africa will account for 25 percent of the world’s population according to projections by the United Nations. What are the implications of this demographic change for the United States, and how should we adjust our policies to anticipate them?

- Africa’s expected population boom will bring new challenges and opportunities to the continent. With half of the population in sub-Saharan Africa expected to be under 21 years old by 2035, there will be a need to create educational and job opportunities for the young population. If jobs are not created, a rise in unemployment could lead to social and political instability and increase the chance of unrest.

The United States can become a key partner in supporting economic growth in Africa by expanding trade agreements (such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act) and increasing U.S. foreign direct investment to promote manufacturing, infrastructure, and innovation of local industry. U.S. economic investment is critical as China is heavily investing in the continent through its Belt and Road Initiative, often through predatory behavior. The U.S. can adjust policies to (1) offer the U.S. as an alternative option (as opposed to China) for countries looking for foreign investment to create jobs, (2) support democratic initiatives and good governance policies, including election monitoring in support of free and fair elections, improving revenue collection, effective policymaking and implementation, and (3) be a helpful partner in providing resources to support economic growth that is less dependent on fossil fuels. With the stakes as high as they currently are for our climate, we must anticipate the growing population’s effect on the environment. A larger population and rapidly developing economy are both common causes for negative environmental outcomes.

Climate

How would you discourage the proliferation of coal-fired power plants in developing countries?

- As populations grow in the developing world, it is easiest to turn to cheap, dirty energy sources to meet increasing energy needs. Developing countries often don’t have the luxury of choosing more expensive, but cleaner, energy sources and greener infrastructure. This is where U.S. global leadership is so incredibly important. There are several policies that the U.S. can lead on to support global renewable energy efforts and many of them center on a key U.S. advantage – innovation which is why I have called for a five-fold increase in Department of Energy basic research to unleash the potential in our scientific community. We must continue to invest in renewable energy sources that can be built and operated for cheaper costs to make these energy sources more economically viable around the world. Additionally, we must invest in direct air capture and negative emissions technologies which suck carbon out of the atmosphere like a vacuum. The UNIPCC report stated that if we want to meet the global emissions reductions goals, we must invest in technology to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The U.S. can become a leader in advancing and exporting this technology for it to be used more widely and at a cheaper cost. The U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement, which was the first global effort where almost all countries around the world committed to addressing climate change, was a mistake. As president, I would rejoin the Paris Agreement on day one.

U.S. Foreign Policy

What has been the greatest foreign policy accomplishment of the United States since World War II? What has been the biggest mistake?

- Our steady and substantial support for and adherence to multilateralism has been our greatest foreign policy accomplishment since World War II. The United Nations and all its agencies, NATO, the IMF, the World Bank, The Asia Development Bank, the InterAmerican Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and other multilateral initiatives have all collectively and individually made enormous and crucial contributions to world peace, economic development and poverty alleviation since World War II. The continued financial and political support of the U.S., in particular the U.S. commitment to the economic model of free enterprise and international engagement, was the most important cornerstone of these multinational efforts.

The Iraq War was the most disastrous foreign policy action of the United States since World War II. The most sacred responsibility of the President of the United States, hopefully in concert with the Congress, is to send our young men and women into combat. That decision should only be made in defense of the citizens of the United States or in defense of our allies or in rare circumstances in favor of crucial humanitarian objectives. In the case of our invasion of Iraq in 2003 there was no clear case made that the United States was threatened in any way by the Republic of Iraq. No unequivocal evidence was presented to support such a threat and the Bush Administration relied on faulty and highly-suspicious reporting regarding weapons of mass destruction. They had no clear plan on what to do following the invasion and the resulting chaos in Iraq led to the loss of hundreds of thousands of U.S. and Iraqi citizens as well as the destabilization of Iraq and the region. U.S. credibility around the world was undermined by our decisions in Iraq. Looking forward, we must be judicious in when we deploy troops to avoid a similar a catastrophic action.

Speeches
Articles

John Delaney says he opposes decriminalizing border crossings, unlike other Democrats

Jul. 7, 2019

By CAMILO MONTOYA-GALVEZ | CBS NEWS Breaking with other Democrats running for the presidential nomination, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney said he does not support a proposal to decriminalize illegal border crossings.   Pledges to repeal Section 1325 of Title 8 of the U.S. code — which makes "improper entry" into the U.S. a federal crime — have gained traction among some of the more progressive candidates in the large Democratic primary field, who say illegal entry into the country should be considered a civil offense instead. During the first night of the Democratic debate in Miami, Obama administration Housing Secretary Julián Castro pressed fellow Texan Beto O'Rourke on his opposition to repealing the law. On the second night, all but one of the candidates indicated they backed a move to decriminalize border crossings.  Although he disagrees with that proposal, Delaney, considered a moderate during his brief time in Congress, said he would it make it "illegal" for the government to separate migrant children from their parents. Under the controversial and now discontinued "zero tolerance" policy, the Trump administration used Section 1325 to prosecute thousands of migrant parents who crossed the southern border and forcibly separate them from their children.  Delaney said migrant families and children should not be detained for protracted periods of time — or even at all. "I don't want children to be detained long at all. I want to go the other way. We have to treat people who cross our borders with a measure of dignity. Right? It has to be reflective of our values," he said.  But the Maryland Democrat said the only way to solve the current surge of Central American families and unaccompanied children heading north — which is expected to dwindle during the hot summer months — is to provide long-term assistance to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, collectively known as the "Northern Triangle." The region has been plagued by deep-rooted political instability, suffocating poverty and rampant violence for decades. Recently, agriculture crops — the main livelihoods for many poor and working-class citizens — have also been destroyed in many areas due to severe weather made worse by climate change.  Delaney said he would reverse President Trump's decision to end U.S. foreign aidto these Central American countries, and organize a new initiative to tackle the most pressing issues in the region so people have the economic opportunities and safety necessary to sustain their families in their homeland.  "When you listen to the stories from these people, you realize that everyone is leaving for the right reason," he added. "They feel threatened, their children are threatened, and unless we do things to rebuild civil society in the three Central American countries, we're going to continue to have this refugee crisis."

John Delaney’s 2020 presidential campaign and policy positions, explained

Jun. 26, 2019

Delaney is waging a long-shot bid for the White House. By Dylan Scott | Vox John Delaney is running for president in the 2020 campaign.  Scott Olson/Getty Images John Delaney was the first notable 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and, nearly two years later, he’s still waging a long-shot bid for the White House. Delaney has secured a spot on the first 2020 debate stage, a validation of sorts for his candidacy. The joke is that the former Maryland congressman stepped away from Congress in 2018 so he could go live in Iowa, the first caucus state, and while he hasn’t ascended very far in the polls, he has done enough to get a voice in the debate. The closest thing to a star moment for Delaney so far was his appearance at the California Democratic Convention, in which he disavowed socialism and major left-wing policies like Medicare-for-all. He was booed by the California crowd, but that wasn’t necessarily a loss for Delaney: he is a former health care financier and clearly wants to position himself as a more moderate candidate who believes in capitalism and pragmatic solutions to policy problems. “We’ve got to be able to have a robust policy debate out in the open, that’s what this primary process should be about. A few boos aren’t a big deal; making a really bad mistake on health care is,” Delaney said after the debate. “We can’t be dedicated to slogans and must ensure that a real debate happens. Most of the Democrats in this field either don’t want to take this on or are trying to play it both ways, but I don’t think that’s responsible.” Delaney sees himself as the adult in the room on a major issue — health care — for the Democratic primary debate. He has a universal health care plan, though it is more limited in benefits and scope than single payer plans. (He is also, notably, still heavily invested in the health care industry; about $3.2 million of his $280 million fortune comes from the health care sector, per Sludge.) It doesn’t necessarily seem like a winning strategy to tell an excited young progressive base that their trademark policy idea is a loser — and Delaney isn’t leaving much of a mark on the 2020 polls. But he is still trying to leave a mark on the policy debate. It’s a project two years in the making. John Delaney has a plan for universal health care — but don’t call it “Medicare-for-all” The former Maryland lawmaker — he was in Congress for six years and was a health care finance executive before entering politics — launched his presidential bid in 2017. In his time in Congress, Delaney regularly had a bipartisan voting record; putting an end to partisan gerrymandering was one of his pet projects. As a presidential candidate, he has promised to spend as much time in Iowa as was necessary to build a credible base in that critical primary state. On foreign policy, Delaney has laid out a free-trade, global engagement agenda, and he doesn’t want to cut military spending, a departure from most of the other Democrats in the field. But health care is arguably his hallmark. Delaney has cooked up his own plan for universal coverage. The plan sticks out for two reasons: He is a former health care financier, so he brings an unusual amount of expertise to the issue, and while his plan is a path to universal coverage, he is going out of his way not to call it Medicare-for-all. Granted, there are a lot of details Delaney still needs to fill in, but the bones are pretty simple: Every American under 65 would be enrolled in a new public plan that covers a certain set of basic medical services, comparable to the essential health services covered by Obamacare. Employers and individuals could purchase supplemental insurance. Medicare for people over 65 would be untouched. The plan would be paid for mostly by maintaining the shared state-federal payments for Medicaid and by ending the unlimited tax break for employer health benefits. He openly defends the role of private insurance in the health care market. As Delaney told Vox in a recent interview: If you think about Medicare, which is an incredibly successful program, its success is in part based on the fact that there is private insurance mixed in with Medicare in terms of these supplemental plans. When I do events with seniors and I say how many of you have Medicare, pretty much all the hands go up. When I say how many have a supplemental plan, most of the hands go up. Why do we want to go around most of those supplement plans that are legal? I think in an effort to try to say I’m gonna move the goalposts further than anyone else, we have created a proposal that actually is really bad economics and also is not what people want. He wants to leave Medicare as it currently exists alone, to avoid rousing the fears of American seniors who worry a dramatic expansion of the program would mean their own benefits might get worse. That’s a line Donald Trump and Republicans are running with, though the current Medicare-for-all proposals would actually improve the benefits and the cost-sharing requirements of the existing Medicare program. “If a Republican was running against Medicare-for-all, they would look at seniors in this country and say, ‘Let me tell you what these Democrats want to do, they want to take the Medicare that you paid for, yes, you paid for, and they want to give it to everyone else,’” he told Vox. “Leave Medicare alone, which doesn’t mean you don’t try to improve it. But it stays as an independent thing. Maybe in 50 years, these programs merge together.” It’s a very specific pitch Delaney is making, both on health care and for his candidacy: Progressive goals are admirable, but Democrats have to be practical about getting there. It’s not dissimilar to the more moderate messages of Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, or Amy Klobuchar. Delaney’s candidacy still looks like a long shot for the time being, but he is clearly intent on continuing to make his case.  

John Delaney on Universal Health Care

Jun. 26, 2019

By Maggie Astor | The New York Times John Delaney, a former congressman from Maryland, has proposed a universal health care system based on a combination of government coverage and private insurance. The context Every American under 65 would be automatically enrolled in a government-run health care program that would cover all “essential health benefits,” including pre-existing conditions. Once they turned 65, they would transition to Medicare. People could forfeit their government coverage and receive a credit to buy private insurance instead. Private insurers could offer “supplemental” plans for services not covered by the public program. How he uses it He argues that it would guarantee universal coverage without forcing people to use a government health plan. “We believe in everyone making their own decisions, so I don’t see why we want to be insisting upon one source of health care for everyone,” he said in an interview last summer. He has made opposition to a single-payer system like “Medicare for all” a central component of his campaign recently, directly challenging Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York. Obstacles The plan would cost trillions of dollars. Mr. Delaney says he would pay for it by, among other steps, letting the government negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies and requiring wealthy Americans to cover part of the cost of their health care. Even with the inclusion of private insurance, the plan would face some of the same political obstacles as “Medicare for all” among conservatives who oppose more government involvement in the health care system.

Events

2020

Jan. 30
Dinner in Cedar Rapids with John Delaney

Thur 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM CST

Granite City, Cedar Rapids

Jan. 30
Lunch in Muscatine with John Delaney

Thur 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM CST

Muscatine's Family Style Restaurant Muscatine, IA

Jan. 27
Lunch in Cedar Falls with John Delaney

Mon 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CST

Mulligan's Brick Oven Cedar Falls, IA