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2019


Congress Bills
Biography

Personal

Political Experience

Professional Experience

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

Additional Information

John Delaney (b. April 16, 1963, in Wood-Ridge, NJ) is a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate. On July 28, 2017, Delaney announced that he would run for president rather than seek re-election to his House seat in 2018.

He is a former Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives representing Maryland's 6th Congressional District. Delaney was first elected to the House on November 6, 2012.

Prior to his congressional career, Delaney founded two New York Stock Exchange companies, as well as Blueprint Maryland, a nonprofit organization focused on the creation of jobs in Maryland's private sector.

Delaney was born in 1963 and grew up in Wood-Ridge, New Jersey. His father was a union electrician, and Delaney has credited scholarships from the union and other community organizations with allowing him to attend Columbia University. He graduated with a B.S. from Columbia in 1985 and went on to receive a J.D. from Georgetown University in 1988.

After graduating from Georgetown, Delaney worked as a lawyer at Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge. From 1990 to 1992, he co-owned and ran a healthcare firm, and in 1993, he co-founded HealthCare Financial Partners, a publicly-traded company that provided loans to healthcare companies. In 2000, Delaney co-founded another publicly-traded lending company, CapitalSource. He was named an Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year in 2004. Delaney founded Blueprint Maryland, a non-profit organization focused on economic development and job creation, in 2011.

On November 6, 2012, Delaney defeated incumbent Roscoe Bartlett (R) for Maryland's 6th Congressional District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was re-elected in 2014 and 2016. Delaney did not run for re-election in 2018.

In 2018, he published a book titled, The Right Answer: How We Can Unify Our Divided Nation.

Below is an abbreviated outline of Delaney's academic, professional, and political career:

  • 2013-2019: U.S. Representative from Maryland's 6th Congressional District
  • 2011: Founded Blueprint Maryland
  • 2000: Founded CapitalSource
  • 1993: Founded Healthcare Financial Partners
Elections

2020

Presidency

An election for president of the United States will be held on November 3, 2020. Delaney filed to run for president on August 10, 2017.

2018

John Delaney did not file to run for re-election.

2016

rated this race as safely Democratic. In Maryland's 6th Congressional District, incumbent John Delaney (D) defeated Amie Hoeber (R), David Howser, George Gluck (G), and Ted Athey (Write-in) in the general election on November 8, 2016. Delaney defeated Tony Puca in the Democratic primary, while Hoeber defeated seven other Republican challengers to win the Republican nomination. The primary elections took place on April 26, 2016.

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 General Election, 2016

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney Incumbent 56% 185,770
Republican Amie Hoeber 40.1% 133,081
Libertarian David Howser 2.1% 6,889
Green George Gluck 1.8% 5,824
N/A Write-in 0.1% 409
Total Votes 331,973
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 Democratic Primary, 2016

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney Incumbent 84.9% 69,343
Tony Puca 15.1% 12,317
Total Votes 81,660
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 Republican Primary, 2016

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAmie Hoeber 29.3% 17,967
Terry Baker 22.6% 13,837
Frank Howard 17.4% 10,677
Robin Ficker 11.4% 7,014
David Vogt 9.4% 5,774
Christopher Mason 4.2% 2,590
Scott Cheng 3.8% 2,303
Harold Painter 1.8% 1,117
Total Votes 61,279
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections

2014

Delaney ran for re-election in Maryland's 6th Congressional District in the general election on November 4, 2014. He ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination in the primary on June 24, 2014. The general election took place on November 4, 2014.

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 General Election, 2014

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney Incumbent 49.7% 94,704
Republican Dan Bongino 48.2% 91,930
Green George Gluck 2% 3,762
Write-in Others 0.1% 140
Total Votes 190,536
Source: Maryland Secretary of State Official Results

He addressed rumors of a possible gubernatorial bid on January 25, 2015.

“Many people I trust and respect have asked me to consider running for governor, and of course I always think about where I may best serve,” Delaney said. “But I love my job, and my expectation is that I will continue to serve in Congress and represent my district.”

2012

Delaney ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House to represent Maryland's 6th District. He defeated Milad Pooran, Robert Garagiola, Charles Bailey, and Ron Little in the Democratic primary on April 3, 2012. He defeated incumbent Roscoe Bartlett (R) and Nickolaus Mueller (L) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run was January 11, 2012.

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 General Election, 2012

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney 58.8% 181,921
Republican Roscoe Bartlett Incumbent 37.9% 117,313
Libertarian Nickolaus Mueller 3.2% 9,916
N/A Other Write-ins 0.1% 399
Total Votes 309,549
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections "Representative in Congress"

U.S. House, Maryland District 6 Democratic Primary, 2012

Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Delaney 54.2% 20,414
Charles Bailey 4.2% 1,572
Rob Garagiola 29.1% 10,981
Ron Little 3% 1,131
Milad Pooran 9.5% 3,590
Total Votes 37,688
Policy Positions

Presidential Election 2020 Political Courage Test

Abortion

1. Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-choice

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Budget

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. In order to balance the budget, do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- Yes

3. Do you support expanding federal funding to support entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare?
- Yes

Education

1. Do you support requiring states to adopt federal education standards?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- Every state will need to meet high standards to make our public school system as strong as possible and provide every student with a high-quality education, but I believe it is important that states maintain some flexibility to design their own curriculums.

Energy & Environment

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- Yes

3. Do you support government funding for the development of renewable energy (e.g. solar, wind, geo-thermal)?
- Yes

Guns

1. Do you generally support gun-control legislation?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Health Care

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")?
- No

Campaign Finance

1. Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Economy

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

3. Do you support lowering corporate taxes as a means of promoting economic growth?
- No

Immigration

1. Other or expanded principles
- I support funding for border security, which could include physical barriers, if experts say it is necessary.

2. Do you support the construction of a wall along the Mexican border?
- No

3. Do you support requiring immigrants who are unlawfully present to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- No

National Security

1. Other or expanded principles
- The United States should use military force only as a last resort and instead focus on diplomatic and economic tools to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction to begin with.

2. Should the United States use military force to prevent governments hostile to the U.S. from possessing a weapon of mass destruction (for example: nuclear, biological, chemical)?
- Yes

3. Do you support reducing military intervention in Middle East conflicts?
- Yes

Administrative Priorities

Please explain in a total of 100 words or less, your top two or three priorities if elected. If they require additional funding for implementation, please explain how you would obtain this funding.
- As president, I would focus on passing my climate change, infrastructure, and trade agendas. My $4 trillion climate plan includes a carbon fee and dividend, increased investment in basic research and negative emissions technology, the creation of a Climate Corps, and building a Carbon Throughway to transport captured carbon for reuse and permanent sequestration. My infrastructure plan includes the creation of an infrastructure bank, an increase in the Highway Trust Fund, and new matching funds to focus on specific infrastructure needs. Lastly, I would reject Trump's isolationist ideology and reenage in rules-based trade, including rejoining the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Trade

1. Do you generally support removing barriers to international trade (for example: tariffs, quotas, etc.)?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Defense

1. Do you support increasing defense spending?
- Unknown Position

2. Other or expanded principles
- It would be irresponsible to promise changes to the national security budget absent a full evaluation of threats and challenges facing the United States in the future. Before setting a budget for the Department of Defense, we need to reassess what we are asking our military to do and ensure they have the resources needed to successfully accomplish the mission. As threats continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, the U.S. Armed Forces need to be able to adapt and make the necessary investments. If we underinvest in our national security, it will leave the U.S. vulnerable.

Articles

Tweet - "Began my morning with a few moments of reflection and prayer for those that we lost on 9/11 and for their families. On this day 18 years ago, so many moms and dads, daughters and sons, husbands and wives left in the morning and never came home."

Sep. 11

"Began my morning with a few moments of reflection and prayer for those that we lost on 9/11 and for their families. On this day 18 years ago, so many moms and dads, daughters and sons, husbands and wives left in the morning and never came home." @JohnDelaney

Tweet - "Today is a solemn day to remember the sacrifice so many made that day helping others, the duty we have to support our 9/11 first responders and their families and the responsibility we have to protect our country from future attacks."

Sep. 11

"Today is a solemn day to remember the sacrifice so many made that day helping others, the duty we have to support our 9/11 first responders and their families and the responsibility we have to protect our country from future attacks." @JohnDelaney

CNN "CNN Newsroom" - Transcript: "Interview with John Delaney"

Aug. 28

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT SCIUTTO: There is a new poll out this morning, showing the top five Democratic candidates, all beating President Trump by a wide margin in a head-to-head race. Of course, it's still early, anything can happen. The primary season, far from -- hasn't even started, in fact, today being one deadline for Democrats to qualify for the September debate. So far, only 10 of the 21 candidates still in the race will face off in that debate next month. John Delaney, he will not be on that stage, but he shows no signs of letting up. Thanks so much for joining us this morning. JOHN DELANEY (D), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Great to be here. SCIUTTO: So, first, your numbers in this poll. You, of course, had to hit that two percent threshold -- DELANEY: Yes. SCIUTTO: -- to make this next debate, you did not. Are you staying in the race? DELANEY: Oh, yes. I'm absolutely staying in the race. The only poll that really matters to me is the Iowa Caucus in many ways, and that's still about six months away. And I think in many ways, this election is just getting started because more and more Americans and more and more Democrats are finally starting to dial in. And I think we're going to see a very different kind of feeling for what kind of candidate we should be putting forth in the next six months. SCIUTTO: OK. Your consistent message is that the Democrats need a moderate candidate to beat President Trump. Joe Biden, I think you could put in that category, he maintains a lead. But you have tremendous support for both Warren and Sanders, who are left of center. Is that a danger for the Democratic Party? DELANEY: It is a danger. And I think Trump's numbers really underscore this point, which is, Trump's numbers are down. They're like 40 percent. That means right now, we're winning the center, which is what we won in 2018, which is how we flipped the House. So we have to make sure we put up a candidate who can hold the great American center. And that's got to be a candidate -- putting aside moderate or progressive, because in many ways, to most Americans, these labels don't mean anything -- we need a candidate with new ideas, who wants to build a big-tent party and puts forth real solutions, not things that turn off voters. Real things that can get done to improve the lives of the American people. And that candidate will win the center and beat Donald Trump by a comfortable margin. SCIUTTO: You do have new ideas being talked about all the time -- DELANEY: Yes. SCIUTTO: -- in the Democratic race. And frequently, things like universal health care, free college tuition or paying off college loans -- DELANEY: Yes. SCIUTTO: -- that kind of thing. Do you think that is the kind of message that wins the center? DELANEY: No, I don't. Because I'm for universal health care. I think every American should have health care as a basic right. But running on a universal health care plan that makes private insurance illegal, that's when you start losing the American people -- SCIUTTO: And that's right in the polls. DELANEY: -- so the American people are with you on universal health care. But when you start saying, "Oh, and by the way, half of you, we're going to completely disrupt your health care," then we start losing them. Free college. Everyone wants to deal with the college debt crisis, everyone wants to make community college free, everyone wants to make college more affordable, everyone wants expanded pre-K. But when you start saying things like writing off all the student loans in this country, people start saying, "Well, that doesn't actually make a lot of sense. I paid off my student loans," right? "What am I, a fool for doing that?" SCIUTTO: Yes. DELANEY: So these are the things. We need new ideas, but just because they're extreme doesn't make them good new ideas. We need new ideas that are responsive to things that the American people are worried about. You know, right now, the American people are really concerned about their pay. We actually don't have as much of a jobs issue right now in this country, we have a huge pay issue. Not enough jobs provide the kind of living -- SCIUTTO: Right. DELANEY: -- that people can earn -- you know, have one job and support their family. So we need new ideas for that. We need new ideas, as to how we're going to engage in the world. We're in a trade war. Most of the Democrats are running on isolationist policies like the president. They have a nicer veneer on them, but they're basically the same policies. So what's going to be our response to the fact that Trump's got us in a trade war? Do we have a vision for how we actually engage in an increasingly interdependent and interconnected world? SCIUTTO: Let me ask you about something with regards to the president directly. Today, there is a story in "The Washington Post" that the president is encouraging aides to break the law to get his border wall built, and even saying that he'd pardon them if they do. Now, I know you get asked about the president's behavior all the time, and I know that folks at home are saying, "Oh, it's just another story about the president doing X or Y." But tell us about the significance of this, because it's not the first time the president has suggested bypassing the law or standards to get what he wants politically. [10:40:00] DELANEY: The president is lawless and he's reckless, and that's how we have to think about him. And that's why it's so important we beat him. And that's why it's so important, we think about the kind of candidate we need to beat him. Because can you imagine what he'll do if he gets re-elected, right? We may think he has no restraint on him right now, but he may actually be restraining himself. And if he gets re-elected and he feels like everything he's done has been validated -- SCIUTTO: Yes. DELANEY: -- he will actually go after things like the separation of powers. He will actually go after things that are so critical to our democracy. SCIUTTO: Right. DELANEY: So he's lawless and he's reckless, and the most important thing is to beat him in 2020. SCIUTTO: So this is a consistent message from you -- DELANEY: Yes. SCIUTTO: -- both on moderate policies needed to beat the president, your criticism of the president. But you're not breaking through in the polls. How do you break through? DELANEY: I just think it's still going to take some time. I think most Americans are actually now just starting to dial in, and most Americans who haven't been that active in politics, like, every day of the year, they tend to be more common-sense. They're interested in solutions. They want to dial the noise down. They hate the partisanship and they want someone who will solve problems and allow us to work together to build a better future. I think that's what most Americans are looking for, I really believe that. And I just think as we get closer to the Iowa caucus, that's going to become the focus of the party. SCIUTTO: Your background is as a businessman. You have your finger on the pulse of the American economy. There are indicators, whether it's in the bond market, the stock market, industrial surveys, production surveys, manufacturing surveys, that the economy is slowing down. DELANEY: Yes. SCIUTTO: Do you see signs of that? And is it imminent, in your view? DELANEY: I don't know if it's imminent. I think it's definitely slowing down. And, listen, I hope it doesn't happen, right? Because it'll hurt American workers. But I think the trade war is clearly hurting our economy and other economies. Because what's happening is, a lot of people are starting to say to themselves, "Is this model for how we thought the world was going to unfold, is it actually going to happen that way or are all these countries going to become kind of nationalist?" In other words, we're not going to become interconnected and we're not going to get the benefits of that. And I think that's scaring people. And I think the president is driving that. I also think his tax cuts and spending programs were a lot of stimulus. They're starting to wear off and he didn't make good investments, right? We didn't invest in infrastructure. If we were in the middle of a $1 to $2 trillion infrastructure program right now, that would be a perfect offset to otherwise kind of slowing economic growth. And these are the things that -- you know, if you run a business like I have -- I ran two public companies, I'm the only person running for president who is a leader in business and a leader in government -- you have to have an economic vision. And the president doesn't have it, this tax cut plan they did, didn't really broadly help the American people, they didn't make smart investments. And we're in the middle of a trade war. SCIUTTO: Right. Just a few things going on -- DELANEY: Sure. SCIUTTO: -- at the same time. DELANEY: Yes. SCIUTTO: John Delaney -- (CROSSTALK) DELANEY: Thanks for having me. Yes. SCIUTTO: -- so much for taking the time. We wish you the best of luck. DELANEY: Thank you. BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT

Debates/Survey

2020

Jan. 27
Lunch in Cedar Falls with John Delaney

Mon 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CST

Mulligan's Brick Oven Cedar Falls, IA

Jan. 27
Lunch in Tripoli with John Delaney

Mon 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM CST

Panther Lanes Tripoli, IA

Jan. 22
Lunch in Elkader with John Delaney

Wed 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM CST

Treats on Bridge Street Bistro Elkader, IA

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