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Quick Facts
Personal Details

Education

  • BS, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Albany College of Pharmacy, 1980-1985

Professional Experience

  • BS, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Albany College of Pharmacy, 1980-1985
  • Registered Pharmacist/President, Marra's Pharmacy, 1985-present

Political Experience

  • BS, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Albany College of Pharmacy, 1980-1985
  • Registered Pharmacist/President, Marra's Pharmacy, 1985-present
  • Majority Steering Vice Chair, New York State Assembly, 2019-present
  • Assembly Member, New York State Assembly, 2012-present
  • Chair, Cohoes Charter Revision Committee
  • Candidate, New York State Assembly, District 108, 2018
  • Mayor, City of Cohoes, 2000-2012

Former Committees/Caucuses

Former Member, Aging Committee, New York State Assembly

Former Chair, Capital District Transportation Committee

Former Member, Cities Committee, New York State Assembly

Former Member, Insurance Committee, New York State Assembly

Former Member, Mental Health Committee, New York State Assembly

Former Chair, Subcommittee on Effective Treatment, New York State Assembly

President, New York State Conference of Mayors, 2008-2012

Current Legislative Committees

Member, Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Committee

Member, Higher Education Committee

Member, Insurance Committee

Member, Local Governments Committee

Member, Real Property Taxation Committee

Member, Ways and Means Committee

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

  • BS, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Albany College of Pharmacy, 1980-1985
  • Registered Pharmacist/President, Marra's Pharmacy, 1985-present
  • Majority Steering Vice Chair, New York State Assembly, 2019-present
  • Assembly Member, New York State Assembly, 2012-present
  • Chair, Cohoes Charter Revision Committee
  • Candidate, New York State Assembly, District 108, 2018
  • Mayor, City of Cohoes, 2000-2012
  • Board Member, Albany Convention Center Authority
  • Member, Board of Governors, New York State Municipal Insurance Reciprocal
  • Former Chair, Cohoes Industrial Development Agency
  • Former Chair, Cohoes Local Development Corporation
  • Member, New York State Local Government Records Management Council
  • Member, New York State Workforce Investment Board
  • Chair, RiverSpark
  • Member, State Comptroller's Local Advisory Team
  • Member, New York State Heritage Areas Advisory Board, 2009-2012
Articles

Governor Cuomo Announces Opening of Materials Engineering Technology Accelerator Center at SUNY Polytechnic Institute

Nov. 8, 2019

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the opening of the Materials Engineering Technology Accelerator, or META Center, which is located on the SUNY Polytechnic Institute campus in Albany. The META Center, led by Applied Materials, Inc., is a first-of-its-kind facility aimed at speeding customer prototyping of new materials, process technologies and devices. At the META Center, engineers can evaluate novel chip materials, structures and devices, testing them in a robust pilot manufacturing environment and accelerating their readiness for customer high-volume manufacturing facilities. "With the opening of the META Center, New York State continues to lead the way by attracting industry leading companies like Applied Materials that will grow our high-tech economy," Governor Cuomo said. "This milestone will lead to many new advancements in research and development, attract new businesses to the state, and bring us closer to the technology of tomorrow, today." The partnership between New York State and Applied Materials was announced in November 2018, and began a new strategic alliance between New York State, SUNY and Applied Materials. Under the agreement, Empire State Development will provide a five-year, $250 million capital grant for the SUNY Research Foundation to purchase and install tools in an advanced research and development facility that will further position the Capital Region to be a global materials engineering research hub. Applied Materials will pay more than $100 million in leases to develop the facility, part of their $600 million investment in the campus. Additionally, researchers across the SUNY system will be invited to submit proposals for joint research and development activities with Applied. Applied's research investments of up to $25 million will be matched by SUNY for up to $50 million in total research funding. The new partnership will also result in internships and research opportunities for SUNY students that are available at no other institute of higher education. Applied Ventures, the venture capital arm of Applied, and its partners will co-invest $20 million in venture capital for early-stage businesses across Upstate New York, with ESD providing an additional $10 million grant for a total of $30 million to foster new technology and create high-tech jobs. Steve Ghanayem, senior vice president of New Markets and Alliances at Applied Materials, said, "We are excited to open the doors of the META Center and invite the industry to collaborate with us to accelerate innovation, from materials to systems." Om Nalamasu, CTO of Applied Materials and president of Applied Ventures, said, "Applied Materials welcomes innovators from established and emerging fields to work with us at the META Center to speed the commercialization of new technologies for the AI Era." SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson said, "The META Center further establishes SUNY Poly as a world-class hub for advanced technology research and development. We are excited to work with Applied Materials to spur new collaboration opportunities throughout the technology sector and across the SUNY network." ESD Acting Commissioner, and President & CEO-designate Eric Gertler said, "New York State is home to a thriving high-tech ecosystem and the opening of the META Center will keep us at the forefront of technology innovation. The partnership we've developed with NY CREATES, SUNY and Applied Materials will create the building blocks to bring new business, research, jobs and educational opportunities to the state for years to come." Dr. Douglas Grose, Future President of NY CREATES, said, "As we reach this milestone with Applied Materials and in partnership with Empire State Development and SUNY, we are proud to note the significant progress which has already been a hallmark of the META Center in its first year. The rapid ramp up of the Center's capabilities and the growth of related, quality high-tech jobs all point to a strong future, and we look forward to supporting this collaboration's positive impact in the region and across New York State." Dr. Grace Wang, SUNY Poly Interim Vice President, said, "I am thrilled to join Governor Cuomo and SUNY in congratulating Applied Materials as they mark the opening of the META Center less than one year after announcing this critical, collaborative materials research and development initiative. As the META Center and efforts such as the research partnership further take shape, SUNY Poly is proud to act as a magnet for faculty, staff, and students from SUNY Poly and beyond to delve into related 21st century advanced materials R&D while we continue to look forward to a bright future supporting New York State's innovation economy." The META Center will be a world-class hub for materials engineering R&D, prototyping and pilot projects for Applied's existing semiconductor customers as well as new high-tech customers in the fields of Artificial Intelligence, Augmented and Virtual Reality, advanced optics, big data, life sciences and autonomous vehicles, among others. The opening of the META Center further solidifies the Capital Region's status as Upstate New York's "Tech Valley" and ensures the SUNY system will remain at the forefront of cutting-edge research, development and innovation in high-tech industries. Applied is the leader in materials engineering solutions used to produce virtually every new chip and advanced display in the world. Senator Neil Breslin said, "The fact that the Meta Center is opening right here in the Capital Region is no accident. The Capital Region is home to world-class academic institutions and cutting edge nanotech companies and the ground-breaking collaboration and research and development that will be possible is a perfect fit for the region. This is another great milestone that will result in more jobs and economic growth for the area." Assemblymember Patricia Fahy said, "The opening of the new META Center marks yet another cutting edge addition to the Tech Valley. Each new STEAM job produces a positive multiplier effect on the surrounding local economy and job market. The growth of SUNY Poly ensures the Capital Region will have a robust tech economy for years to come." Assemblymember John T. McDonald III said, "The opening of the Materials Engineering Technology Accelerator (META Center) on the SUNY Polytechnic Institute campus is welcome news from a technological standpoint and an unprecedented opportunity for SUNY Poly in terms of the economic benefits as well as to our Capital Region due to the other private sector investments that the META Center will be contributing to the campus. This partnership will yield dividends for our Capital Region Tech Valley and will contribute to economic growth in the region, an accomplishment for everyone involved." Albany County Executive Daniel P. McCoy said, "The grand opening of the Applied Materials META Center at SUNY Poly strengthens the growing "Tech-Valley" ecosystem that has been a boon to the Capital Region. The META Center will provide an engine for advanced research and development and will continue to bring new and exciting businesses to the region which will result in well-paying jobs and economic opportunities." Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan said, "Albany is proud to be home to one of the country's truly great research and development institutions at SUNY Poly, and we are excited that the META Center is opening its doors in the Capital City. This significant investment by the state demonstrates Governor Cuomo's commitment to ensuring that New York's 'Tech Valley' will continue its proud tradition of leading the way on innovation for years to come." For nearly two decades, New York State research facilities have been at the center of significant technological advancements and breakthroughs, from developing the machinery and equipment for next-generation wafers to inventing some of the smallest and most advanced computer chips in the world. By hosting industry-leading public-private consortiums, the region's transformation to "Tech Valley" - a global hub for nanotechnology, semiconductor R&D and manufacturing, and industry leading public-private consortiums - has generated billions in economic activity and tens of thousands of jobs throughout the Capital Region. A 2018 report by Georgetown University estimated that more than 60,000 total direct, indirect, induced, and construction jobs upstate are attributable to nanotechnology, driven in large part by the semiconductor industry. The semiconductor industry is a major economic contributor both nationally and within New York State. A recent U.S. Semiconductor Industry Association analysis estimated that each direct semiconductor industry job enables 4.89 jobs in other sectors of the economy, with the U.S. semiconductor industry accounting for roughly a quarter of a million direct U.S. jobs and over a million additional indirect jobs.

Governor Cuomo Announces Results of Landmark Air Quality Study in Albany's South End

Oct. 21, 2019

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the findings of a state-of-the-art air quality study in Albany's South End community and new State-led actions to help address air pollution in the area. Directed by Governor Cuomo, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation launched a study in 2017 to assess potential emission sources - including trains and vehicle traffic - that impact air quality in this Environmental Justice community. In addition, the Governor announced mitigation measures that DEC is implementing in coordination with the State Department of Transportation, the City of Albany and the Albany Housing Authority; these measures include rerouting trucks, reclassifying roads, minimizing residents' exposure to indoor air pollution, among other efforts. "New York is taking aggressive action to tackle air quality and other environmental health issues impacting residents across the state, and Albany's South End is no exception," Governor Cuomo said. "In the short term this innovative new study gives us the facts we need to implement new measures to reduce community exposure to truck pollutants, and in the long term it will serve as a model for other communities across the state as we advance our efforts to create a cleaner, greener New York for all." "This first-ever community driven scientific study address the important issue of air quality in Albany's South End neighborhood," said Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul. "As a result of the study, the state plans to partner with local stakeholders to address concerns and reduce the negative impact emissions have on air quality in the area. We want to reduce contaminants to help improve public health for local residents and promote a cleaner and greener environment." DEC designed the study as a model that can be replicated in other communities across the state. During the study, DEC worked closely with the community over 15 months to collect street-level measurements of air quality at strategic locations and performed more than a year of continuous monitoring to account for meteorological and source activity variability. A video featuring DEC researchers and partners conducting the study is available here. Conducted during 2017 and 2018, the study included an estimated 260 hours of backpack air monitoring, during which DEC researchers walked 780 miles over 6,480 hours using portable monitors. Researchers took a total of 8,570 photos of vehicles traveling through the area, gathered 70,000 hours of monitoring data and collected benzene samples at more than 100 locations. In addition, the State Department of Transportation collected 4,400 hours of traffic data. The study found that more particulate matter is coming from local traffic rather than activities at the Port of Albany and that emissions from locomotives and port shipping transport are minimal in comparison to local traffic. The study then transitioned to focus on local traffic pollutants. DEC analyzed DOT's traffic data during periods of the day when vehicle volumes were higher on South Pearl Street, and reviewed data from community monitors which showed trucks are responsible for the majority of traffic pollutants at Ezra Prentice Homes. Overall, data shows that traffic pollutants are relatively uniform throughout the South End, except for Ezra Prentice, and that trucks are contributing the most to traffic pollutants while traveling to and from businesses and other operations located south of Ezra Prentice. Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos said, "Through Governor Cuomo's leadership and an investment of $500,000 from the State's Environmental Protection Fund, DEC executed a first-of-its-kind study to protect public health in Albany's South End neighborhood. By partnering with local residents, this study is providing a better understanding of air quality in this neighborhood and will help guide future initiatives to protect air quality in Environmental Justice communities across the State." The study evaluated pollutants, including benzene and diesel emissions, and collected unprecedented levels of detail about particulate pollutants primarily associated with mobile sources in the community and further evaluated the vehicle types associated with higher emissions. Particulate pollutants associated with mobile sources continue to be monitored at Ezra Prentice. As part of the study, middle and high school students from the Science and Technology Entry Program at the University of Albany collected air quality measurements with DEC scientists. The study has already resulted in the City of Albany directing its Department of General Services to prohibit city vehicles from using South Pearl Street, except for regularly scheduled solid waste pickup and street cleaning. Key Study Findings The Ezra Prentice community is disproportionately impacted by truck pollutants. The study found truck pollutants on South Pearl Street at Ezra Prentice homes are higher compared to the rest of the Albany South End community. Portable air monitoring also found higher concentrations on the east side of South Pearl Street and closer to the road. Traffic pollutant concentrations are relatively similar in the rest of the complex and drop to background levels approximately 250 feet from the road. While total traffic volume at Ezra Prentice and a comparison road (Southern Boulevard in Albany) are similar, Ezra Prentice has approximately six times the truck volume. Benzene sampling found higher levels near operations that store and transfer gasoline and petroleum products, and the community monitor shows Port activities contribute to local benzene concentrations. Benzene concentrations are slightly higher at the monitor near Albany County Health Department compared to other DEC network monitors in urban areas. Benzene concentrations are lower at Ezra Prentice, compared to the Albany monitor, because the Albany monitor is more frequently downwind of gasoline and petroleum terminals. DOH Health Outcome Review The State Department of Health conducted a Health Outcome Review to address health concerns in the Ezra Prentice community. The review focused on outcomes related to air pollution and evaluated emergency department and hospitalization data from 2005 through 2015. Rates of respiratory and other health outcomes in the South End were compared to those in a City neighborhood with similar demographics. Rates of respiratory outcomes including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute bronchitis and asthma, as well as hypertension and diabetes, were higher in South End compared to the Arbor Hill/West Hill neighborhood. While differences in the health outcome rates are suggestive of exposure differences between the two communities, they cannot prove cause and effect because individual level risk factors were not taken into account. However, these results support taking actions to reduce air pollution in the Ezra Prentice neighborhood. New York State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said, "Clean air should not be determined by zip code and steps must be taken, especially in our most vulnerable neighborhoods, to reduce the harmful emissions created by increased traffic and industry. At Governor Cuomo's direction, this thorough air-quality study conducted in Albany's South End will help inform efforts to address air pollution and improve the health and quality of life for residents." New Actions to Reduce Air Pollution and Exposure As a result of the study and directed by Governor Cuomo, state agencies are undertaking new actions to reduce community exposure to truck pollutants in coordination with local officials: -DEC and DOT are making $20 million available from the Volkswagen settlement and other resources to fund clean trucks statewide, with a focus on environmental justice communities like the South End. DEC is also working with identified truck fleets to evaluate ways fleets can reduce emissions. DEC has allocated an additional $52.4 million for future projects to replace transit, school and paratransit buses statewide.-DEC is conducting enforcement checks and imposing fines on trucks with high emissions on South Pearl Street.-DEC is conducting frequent leak detection inspections at gasoline and petroleum handling facilities using new state-of-the-art equipment, followed by enforcement, as appropriate. DEC has required one gasoline and petroleum terminal in Rensselaer to repair leaks identified using that equipment.-DOT, in coordination with the City of Albany, has reclassified four roads within the Port of Albany to create the potential for trucks to be rerouted away from the area near Ezra Prentice.-DOT is committed to providing technical support to the City of Albany, including direct engineering assistance, in support of the city's continued assessment of South Pearl Street and potential alternative routes for truck traffic.-The Mayor's Office is helping coordinate the voluntary rerouting of frequent truck traffic by several commercial entities with a presence in and near the South End. Traffic monitoring demonstrates that these efforts have reduced truck and bus traffic by 30 percent on South Pearl Street-The Mayor's Office directed the City of Albany Department of General Services to prohibit its vehicles from using South Pearl Street other than for regularly scheduled solid waste pickup and street cleaning. DGS has acquired a street cleaning vacuum to use along the South Pearl Street corridor daily to help reduce particle resuspension. Mayor Kathy Sheehan also assisted the State's efforts by facilitating meetings between DEC and local transportation companies to help provide additional data.-DEC continues to monitor traffic-related pollutants at Ezra Prentice while evaluating ways to adapt and transfer knowledge gained from this study to other near-road and Environmental Justice communities across the state to mitigate traffic pollutants.-The Albany Housing Authority is minimizing residents' indoor exposure to traffic pollutants. AHA is providing professionally installed window air conditioners where appropriate, as early as this year, beginning with residences closest to South Pearl Street and moving outward. AHA is evaluating other strategies for reducing pollution from entering the apartments, such as the effectiveness of central air conditioning. AHA will increase door-to-door advocacy with healthcare partners to increase awareness and education related to indoor air quality.-DEC, the Mayor's Office and AHA are leading a workgroup to develop mitigation strategies and ensure implementation of overall approaches. The workgroup will evaluate the effectiveness of roadside barriers such as green walls where appropriate. DEC's year-long study, supported by $500,000 from the State's Environmental Protection Fund, is in addition to previous efforts in the South End. DEC launched an air screening study in 2014, air quality monitoring for hydrogen sulfide in 2015 - 2017 and added an air toxics monitor in the community to the existing monitoring network in 2015. DEC has also conducted increased vehicle and facility inspections in the community as part of its Operation Eco-Quality. In April 2017, the Capital District Transportation Committee researched and analyzed truck traffic patterns along South Pearl Street at Ezra Prentice homes. The results were used to develop potential strategies to mitigate the negative impacts of truck traffic on the residents in the study area. Senator Neil Breslin said, "I am pleased to see the actions taken by Governor Cuomo and the Department of Environmental Conservation as well as input from local residents, to identify problems and find solutions in reference to the air quality and truck pollutants in the Ezra Prentice community. Strategically rerouting trucks from the neighborhood has already provided dividends by reducing truck and bus traffic by 30 percent. The continued monitoring of air and traffic pollutants in the Ezra Prentice neighborhood will lead to better air quality and reduce pollution." Assembly Member John T. McDonald III said, "The South End Air Quality Study results include proactive next steps that will build upon the state, local, and community partnership that has led this process. I am confident that the community engagement that spurred the study will continue as these action items are implemented. The health and safety of our residents is paramount and I will continue to work ensure that the necessary protections are in place." Assembly Member Patricia Fahy said, "Residents in Albany's South End neighborhood have endured lower air quality and pollution for years as a result of local traffic and truck emissions. I commend the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Governor for initiating this study and for taking meaningful steps working with the City of Albany to address this environmental justice issue. The host of actions announced by the state to redirect truck routes, local traffic routes, and otherwise based off the study's findings show a commitment to rectifying what has become an environmental justice issue over the last few years for many South End residents." Albany County Executive Daniel P. McCoy said, "I've been fighting for the residents of Ezra Prentice since I called for the 2014 moratorium on Global Partners' expansion plans at the Port of Albany, which helped bring attention to air quality in this neighborhood. Everyone, no matter their zip code, deserves clean air, and the alarming findings in this study show that more needs to be done to uphold that fundamental right. I commend the Governor, the DEC and the DOH for conducting this comprehensive analysis that will lay the groundwork for real change in the South End." Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan said, "Since taking office, I have worked closely with Council Members, community members, and local businesses to identify solutions that will improve the health and well-being of the residents of Albany's South End. This air quality study has helped us identify further action we can take together to address important quality of life issues for those living in effected neighborhoods. Thank you to Governor Cuomo and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation for undertaking this innovative study."

Governor Cuomo Announces Completion of $26.8 Million Ida Yarbrough Affordable Housing Redevelopment in Albany

Oct. 16, 2019

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the $26.8 million second phase of the Ida Yarbrough Homes Redevelopment initiative is complete, with 76 apartments now available for families with a mix of income levels. The new development, officially known as 280 North, involved the demolition of a portion of the outdated Ida Yarbrough public housing complex, replacing it with modern affordable homes for families and continuing the revitalization of the Arbor Hill neighborhood. "As Albany and the Arbor Hill neighborhood continue their resurgence, it is critical that we create new affordable housing to ensure that all residents can share in the renewal efforts," Governor Cuomo said. "With the addition of these new affordable apartments, we are committed to building a more vibrant and economically diverse downtown Albany." "The Ida Yarbrough Homes Redevelopment in Albany will be a significant boost for the Arbor Hill neighborhood, adding modern housing options for local families," said Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul. "This project continues revitalization efforts in the community, adding new housing stock and enhancing quality of life in the area. The investment is part of our $20 billion, five-year housing plan to add and preserve affordable housing to ensure all New Yorkers have a great place to call home." The Ida Yarbrough Homes Redevelopment is part of the Governor's commitment to provide all New Yorkers with access to safe, affordable housing through his unprecedented $20 billion, five-year housing plan to build or preserve more than 100,000 affordable homes and 6,000 homes with supportive services. The plan is a comprehensive approach to statewide housing issues that includes multi-family and single-family housing and community development initiatives to make housing accessible and combat homelessness. Since 2011, New York State Homes and Community Renewal (HCR) has financed the creation or preservation of more than 4,700 affordable multifamily homes in Capital Region with nearly 1,900 homes in the city of Albany, made possible with more than $130 million in HCR resources. The 280 North project includes two components at the corner of North Pearl Street and Lark Drive - a seven-story multifamily building with 62 apartments and a three-story building with ten apartments. The complex also includes two duplexes at 531 Lark Street. There are 12 units set aside for homeless families and an additional 12 will be accessible and fully adapted for those living with mobility, vision and hearing disabilities. The project is designed to accommodate large families with a mix of one, two, three, four, and five-bedroom apartments. The development was built to Enterprise Green Communities and ENERGY STAR standards, and boasts ample green space including a community garden and a playground made with reclaimed and recycled materials. Among the amenities for 280 North tenants is access to both on-street and off-street parking, and proximity to public transportation. In addition, an on-site fitness center equipped with cardiovascular machines and weight training equipment is available to tenants free of charge through Capital District Physicians' Health Plan (CDPHP). The original Ida Yarbrough Homes were built in the 1970s and managed by the Albany Housing Authority (AHA). By demolishing the pre-existing and obsolete buildings, the AHA reconfigured the property to add more units and allowing for more green space and recreational use. When complete, the four-phase project will include 335 apartments and up six to eight homeownership opportunities for families. The third phase recently received a $200,000 award as part of Governor Cuomo's Downtown Revitalization Initiative, announced in July to develop up to 10 new home ownership units at Ida Yarbrough Homes. The state's investment in Ida Yarbrough joins developments such as Sheridan Hollow Village and Academy Lofts that are supporting the city's strategic plan for Arbor Hill--transforming vacant structures, injecting new energy into the community, and improving housing options and quality of life. New York State Homes and Community Renewal provided federal and state Low-Income Housing Credits that generated $18 million in equity an additional $2 million in subsidy. HCR funds leveraged a $3.2 million investment from Key Bank, $1.1 million from the Albany Housing Authority, and additional funding from the LISC Housing Stabilization Fund and the City of Albany. Commissioner of New York State Homes and Community Renewal RuthAnne Visnauskas said, "The transformation taking hold here is nothing short of remarkable. In the short space of three years, we've brought more than 160 new apartments online to help anchor and improve this newly emerging Arbor Hill neighborhood. And true to Governor Cuomo's conviction that affordable housing should encourage diversity, opportunity and inclusion, 280 North is deeply affordable and wonderfully configured for large households - a place to put down roots and grow." Senator Neil Breslin said, "This affordable housing development will help further transform Albany's growing Arbor Square neighborhood. Along the varying types of apartments there is also ample green space, a community garden and access to numerous amenities nearby. I applaud the New York State Homes and Community Renewal for their efforts in helping to make our communities a better place to live, work and raise a family." Assembly Member John T. McDonald III said, "I am excited to see the completion of the 280 North affordable housing development in Albany's Arbor Square neighborhood. I appreciate the ongoing support of New York State Homes and Community Renewal and Governor Cuomo on this project. Albany continues to see major investments for affordable housing options for our residents throughout the city and this funding is an example of how to utilize public funds for a public purpose." Assembly Member Patricia Fahy said, "I commend the Albany Housing Authority for their commitment to replacing existing, outmoded public housing with new, affordable units for residents. This new housing development will help to foster the Arbor Square neighborhood's sense of community with a new garden and playground, and provide residents with modern and affordable living." Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan said, "Affordable housing is an integral component of vibrant communities. The completion of the Ida Yarbrough Homes Phase II redevelopment initiative ensures state-of-the-art housing will be available to low- and moderate-income individuals and families for years to come. Thank you to the Albany Housing Authority and Governor Cuomo for their commitment to enhancing affordable housing in New York's Capital City." Albany Housing Authority Executive Director Steve Longo said, "The Albany Housing Authority is proud to continue with the redevelopment of Ida Yarbrough, having finished Phase I last year, and now turning the keys over to new residents of Phase II, the stunning and energy efficient 280 North building. We may be designated as the primary developer of this project, but efforts like these are the result of collaboration among many partners within the private sector, city of Albany, New York state, and federal agencies. We are also excited to have our redevelopment efforts in concert with multiple recent neighborhood investments and developments from The Proctors Collaborative, Albany Distillery and Death Wish Coffee. We look forward to moving on to Phase III and Phase IV as part of the multi-year integrated Arbor Hill Neighborhood Plan." Jolie Milstein, President and CEO of the New York State Association for Affordable Housing said, "We are thrilled to see initiatives like 280 North expand affordable housing opportunities to Albany residents. This development is an exceptional example of mixed-income housing for low- and moderate-income families, including housing set aside for the formerly homeless. The project represents yet another example of how the combined efforts from HCR and Governor Cuomo can expand affordable housing, and this partnership should serve as a model for projects across other states in addressing the national housing crisis head-on." The Proctors Collaborative CEO Philip Morris said, "The Albany Housing Authority has made the redevelopment of the Ida Yarbrough housing and neighborhood a priority for a number of years. The results are coming in quickly now with hundreds of market rate, as well as affordable housing options, new attractions like Albany Distilling and Death Wish coffee, and the new complex for Capital Repertory Theatre. Looks like a home run!" Capital District Physicians' Health Plan President and CEO Dr. John D. Bennett said, "Founded by physicians, CDPHP understands the role that physical fitness plays on a person's overall health. We are thrilled to partner with the Albany Housing Authority on the opening of our latest Fitness Connect location, located inside 280 North, providing residents with a free and convenient place to work out." KeyBank, Capital Region President Ruth Mahoney said, "This project is an example of KeyBank's community development lending commitment and focus to help people thrive across upstate New York. Through these new housing units and the education and resources AHA provides to people of all backgrounds, AHA is doing important work in the effort to tackle the affordable housing issue in our region. KeyBank is proud to be a partner." Phase One of the Ida Yarbrough Homes Redevelopment was completed in 2017 and included 11 newly constructed buildings with 61 townhomes and garden apartments. Located at 270 North Pearl Street, the complex features 17 two-bedroom homes; 22 three-bedroom homes; 19 four-bedroom homes and three five-bedroom homes. Ten units have been set aside for formerly homeless families. Phase One construction began in July 2016 and involved the demolition of five of the original Ida Yarbrough Homes low-rise buildings. All of the new homes are occupied. About the Albany Housing Authority: Since its creation in 1948, the Albany Housing Authority has evolved to provide leadership in meeting the needs and aspirations of its residents and their communities. More than just housing, today the Authority offers families a foundation from which to build successful lives, inspiring investment in self and community through quality rental, homeownership, employment and small business opportunities. We are an able partner for those who wish to transform their future, and that of their community, into one of choice. Visit us at www.albanyhousing.org.

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2020

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