Share on WeChat
https://www.powervoter.us/mike_pence
Copy the link and open WeChat to share.
 Share on WeChat
Copy the link and open WeChat to share.
 Share on WeChat
Scan QRCode using WeChat,and then click the icon at the top-right corner of your screen.
 Share on WeChat
Scan QRCode using WeChat,and then click the icon at the top-right corner of your screen.

Mike Pence

R

Vice President (2017 - Present)

Congress Bills
Biography

Personal

Political Experience

Professional Experience

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

Additional Information

Policy Positions

Indiana Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test

Legislative Priorities

Please explain in a total of 100 words or less, your top two or three priorities if elected. If they require additional funding for implementation, please explain how you would obtain this funding.
- No Answer

Abortion

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding abortion.

1. Abortions should always be illegal.
- No Answer

2. Abortions should always be legal.
- No Answer

3. Abortions should be legal when the pregnancy resulted from incest or rape.
- No Answer

4. Abortions should be legal when the life of the woman is endangered.
- X

5. Abortions should be legal only within the first trimester.
- No Answer

6. Dilation and extraction or "partial-birth" abortion procedures should be legal.
- No Answer

7. Medicare, Medicaid, and federal subsidies should be prohibited from being used on abortion procedures.
- X

8. Other or expanded principles.
- No Answer

Crime

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding crime.

1. Support mandatory jail sentences for selling illegal drugs.
- X

2. Support strict penalties for internet crime (e.g. hacking, identity theft, worms/viruses).
- X

3. Require that crimes based on sexual orientation be prosecuted as federal hate crimes.
- No Answer

4. Support programs to provide prison inmates with vocational and job-related skills and job-placement assistance when released.
- X

5. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

6. Support the use of the death penalty for federal crimes.
- X

7. Eliminate the use of the death penalty for federal crimes.
- No Answer

8. Support programs to provide prison inmates with drug and alcohol addiction treatment.
- X

9. Reduce prison sentences for those who commit non-violent crimes.
- No Answer

Education

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding education.

1. Support federal tax incentives to help families save for college.
- X

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

3. Support the federal government funding universal pre-K programs.
- No Answer

4. Allow teachers and professionals to receive federal funding to establish charter or magnet schools.
- X

5. Increase funding for the Pell Grant program.
- X

6. Decrease interest rates of Stafford Loans.
- X

7. Ban university financial aid officers from owning stock in or accepting gifts from student loan lenders.
- No Answer

8. Require universities to disclose financial relationships with lenders.
- X

9. Eliminate all federal education standards and testing requirements for K-12 students (No Child Left Behind).
- X

10. Support federal education standards and testing requirements for K-12 students (No Child Left Behind).
- No Answer

11. Allow parents to use vouchers to send their children to any public school.
- X

12. Allow parents to use vouchers to send their children to any private or religious school.
- X

Gun

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding guns.

1. Allow individuals to carry concealed guns.
- X

2. Ban the sale, ownership or possession of handguns except by law enforcement and other government officials.
- No Answer

Health

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding health.

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Implement a universal healthcare program to guarantee coverage to all Americans, regardless of income.
- No Answer

3. Allow the importation of prescription drugs into the United States.
- No Answer

4. Support expanding child healthcare programs.
- No Answer

5. Providing healthcare is not a responsibility of the federal government.
- No Answer

6. Expand eligibility for tax-free medical savings accounts.
- X

7. Support expanding prescription drug coverage under Medicare.
- No Answer

8. Offer tax credits to individuals and small businesses to offset the cost of insurance coverage.
- X

Campaign Finance and Government Reform

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding campaign finance and government reform.

1. Prohibit Political Action Committee (PAC) contributions to candidates for federal office.
- No Answer

2. Allow unregulated soft money campaign contributions to political parties or committees.
- No Answer

3. Remove all contribution limits on federal campaigns and parties.
- No Answer

4. Support increasing the amount individuals are permitted to contribute to federal campaigns.
- No Answer

5. Support prohibiting ads containing candidates' name that are paid for by third parties from airing 60 days before a primary and 30 days before a general federal election.
- No Answer

6. Support instant run-off voting (IRV).
- No Answer

7. Support designating Election Day as a national holiday.
- No Answer

8. Support giving the President the power of the line item veto for items concerning appropriations.
- No Answer

9. Support limiting the President's use of signing statements in order to prevent an alternative interpretation of the bill.
- No Answer

10. Support a federal shield law to protect reporter-source privilege.
- No Answer

11. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Employment

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding employment.

1. Increase funding for national job-training programs that retrain displaced workers or teach skills needed in today?s job market.
- No Answer

2. Reduce government regulation of the private sector.
- X

3. Encourage employers to offer child care services, flex-time scheduling, comp-time, and unpaid leave for family emergencies.
- No Answer

4. Increase the federal minimum wage.
- No Answer

5. Support the right of workers to unionize.
- No Answer

6. Eliminate all federal programs designed to reduce unemployment.
- No Answer

7. Include sexual orientation in federal anti-discrimination laws.
- No Answer

8. Include gender identity in federal anti-discrimination laws.
- No Answer

9. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Environment and Energy

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding the environment and energy.

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Strengthen emission controls on all gasoline and diesel-powered engines, including cars, trucks, and sport utility vehicles.
- No Answer

3. Strengthen fuel efficiency standards on all gasoline and diesel-powered engines, including cars, trucks, and sport utility vehicles.
- X

4. Support domestic oil exploration in areas that are currently restricted.
- X

5. Encourage further development and use of alternative fuels.
- X

6. Support research and development of nuclear reactors as an alternative energy source.
- X

7. Allow energy producers to trade pollution credits under "cap and trade" laws.
- No Answer

8. Support international mandatory emission targets to limit global warming.
- No Answer

9. Support international voluntary emission targets to limit global warming.
- No Answer

10. Strengthen the regulation and enforcement of the Clean Water Act.
- No Answer

11. Strengthen the regulation and enforcement of the Clean Air Act.
- No Answer

12. Support increased development of traditional energy resources (e.g. coal, natural gas, oil).
- X

13. Support the use of ethanol as an alternative fuel.
- X

Social

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding social issues.

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Should same-sex couples be allowed to marry?
- No

3. Do you support a federal constitutional amendment defining marriage as between a man and a woman?
- Yes

4. Do you support federal funding for research on existing embryonic stem cell lines?
- No

5. Do you support federal funding to create lines of stem cells from new embryos?
- No

6. Should the federal government consider race and gender in government contracting decisions?
- No

7. Should the federal government continue affirmative action programs?
- No Answer

8. Should the federal government regulate internet gambling?
- No Answer

Welfare and Poverty

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding welfare and poverty.

1. Support housing assistance for welfare recipients.
- No Answer

2. Require welfare recipients to spend at least 40 hours a week in a combination of work and training programs.
- No Answer

3. Continue to give states and local governments flexibility in and responsibility for welfare programs through federal block grants.
- X

4. Abolish all federal welfare programs.
- No Answer

5. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Immigration

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding immigration.

1. Decrease the number of legal immigrants allowed into the country.
- No Answer

2. Establish English as the official national language.
- X

3. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

4. Support a temporary worker program.
- X

5. Support harsher financial punishments for those who knowingly employ illegal immigrants.
- X

6. Support amnesty for illegal immigrants already working in the United States.
- No Answer

7. Illegal immigrants should have to return to their countries of origin before being considered for citizenship.
- X

8. Illegal immigrants should be given a pathway to citizenship.
- No Answer

9. Support merit-based visas over family-based visas.
- No Answer

National Security

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding national security.

1. Should law enforcement agencies have greater discretion to monitor domestic communications, to prevent future terrorist attacks?
- Undecided

2. Do you support pre-emptive military strikes against countries deemed to be a threat to United States national security?
- Undecided

3. Do you support the creation of a federal identification card system?
- No

4. Do you support long-term use of National Guard troops to supplement the armed forces in assignments overseas?
- Yes

5. Should the United States expand its missile defense shield?
- Yes

6. Other or expanded principles
- The question regarding whether law enforcement should have "greater discretion" is too broad in determining the balance between civil liberties and national security. Specifics are necessary. Again, the question on pre-emptive strikes cannot be answered without addressing the nature of the "threat". National guard units should only be used in long-term overseas assignments during a time of war.

7. Do you support using military tribunals to try suspected terrorists when ordinary civilian courts are deemed inappropriate or impractical?
- Yes

8. Should the United States hold foreign states accountable for terrorists who operate in their country?
- Yes

9. Should the federal government increase funding to states and cities for homeland security?
- Yes

Social Security

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding Social Security.

1. Allow workers to invest a portion of their payroll tax in private accounts that they manage themselves.
- X

2. Ensure the viability of Social Security by increasing the payroll tax.
- No Answer

3. Decrease benefits paid to retirees.
- No Answer

4. Support proportional increases of Social Security benefits based on the cost of living index.
- X

5. Raise the retirement age for individual eligibility to receive full Social Security benefits.
- No Answer

6. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Budgetary, Spending, and Tax

Indicate what federal funding levels (#1-6) you support for the following general categories. Select one number per category, you can use a number more than once.

Budget Priorities

1. Agriculture
- Slightly Decrease

2. Arts
- Slightly Decrease

3. Defense
- Slightly Increase

4. Education
- Slightly Decrease

5. Environment
- Slightly Decrease

6. FEMA
- Maintain Status

7. Homeland security
- Slightly Increase

8. International aid
- Slightly Decrease

9. Law enforcement (Federal)
- Slightly Increase

10. Law enforcement (State)
- Slightly Increase

11. Medical research
- Maintain Status

12. National parks
- Slightly Decrease

13. Public health services
- Maintain Status

14. Scientific research
- Slightly Decrease

15. Space exploration programs
- Maintain Status

16. Transportation and highway infrastructure
- Slightly Decrease

17. United Nations
- Greatly Decrease

18. Welfare
- Slightly Decrease

19. Other or expanded categories
- No Answer

Defense Spending

1. Other or expanded categories
- No Answer

2. Armed forces personnel training
- Slightly Increase

3. Intelligence operations
- Greatly Increase

4. Military hardware
- Slightly Increase

5. Modernization of weaponry and equipment
- Slightly Increase

6. National missile defense
- Greatly Increase

7. Pay for active duty personnel
- Slightly Increase

8. Programs to improve troop retention rates
- Slightly Increase

9. Research and development of new weapons
- Slightly Increase

10. Troop and equipment readiness
- Greatly Increase

Taxes

Indicate what federal tax levels (#1-6) you support for the following general categories. Select one number per category, you can use a number more than once.

Family Income Taxes

1. Less than $12,000
- Slightly Decrease

2. $12,001-$40,000
- Slightly Decrease

3. $40,001-$100,000
- Slightly Decrease

4. $100,001-$180,000
- Slightly Decrease

5. $180,001-$350,000
- Slightly Decrease

6. $350,001 and above
- Slightly Decrease

7. Other or expanded categories
- No Answer

Other Taxes

1. Other or expanded categories
- No Answer

2. Alcohol taxes
- Slightly Decrease

3. Capital gains taxes
- Greatly Decrease

4. Cigarette taxes
- Slightly Decrease

5. Corporate taxes
- Slightly Decrease

6. Gasoline taxes
- Slightly Decrease

7. Inheritance taxes
- Greatly Decrease

Deductions/Credits

1. Charitable contribution deduction
- Slightly Increase

2. Child tax credit
- Slightly Increase

3. Earned income tax credit
- Slightly Increase

4. Medical expense deduction
- Slightly Increase

5. Mortgage deduction
- Slightly Increase

6. Student loan credit
- Slightly Increase

7. Do you support the permanent repeal of the federal estate tax?
- Yes

8. Do you support requiring the federal budget to be balanced each year?
- Yes

9. Other or expanded principles
- I support a Constitutional Balanced Budget Amendment and budget process reform in Congress, such as a line item veto and sunset commission.

10. Other or expanded categories
- No Answer

Gun

On (c) and (d), indicate what levels (#1-6) you support for the following categories.

1. Enforcement of existing restrictions on the purchase and possession of guns.
- Maintain Status

2. Restrictions on the purchase and possession of guns.
- Maintain Status

3. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

International Aid, International Policy, and International Trade

International Aid

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding international aid.

1. Support the United States granting aid to countries when extraordinary circumstances cause disaster and threaten civilian lives.
- X

2. Support the United States granting aid to countries when it is in the security interests of the United States.
- X

3. Eliminate United States aid for any nation with documented human rights abuses.
- No Answer

4. Aid granted by the United States should be scaled back and eventually eliminated.
- No Answer

5. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

International Policy

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding international policy.

1. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

2. Should the United States continue to provide leadership in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process?
- Yes

3. Should the United States support the creation of a Palestinian state?
- No

4. Should the United States impose greater international sanctions on Iran if it continues to defy United Nations mandates?
- Yes

5. Should the United States support the Lebanese government against insurgent forces?
- Yes

6. Should the United States maintain its troop levels in Iraq?
- No

7. Should the United States withdraw its troops from Iraq?
- No

8. Discuss your proposals for Iraq.
- I support the current reduction in troop levels based upon the recommendations of the military leaders on the ground in Iraq. The strategy must be "win and come home" in that order.

9. Should the United States apply greater economic and diplomatic sanctions against North Korea if it fails to abide by its agreement to suspend its nuclear program?
- Yes

10. Should the United States increase financial support for Afghanistan?
- Yes

11. Should the United States increase military support for Afghanistan?
- Yes

12. Should the United States trade nuclear fuel to India for civilian purposes?
- No Answer

13. Should the United States decrease financial support for Pakistan?
- No Answer

14. Should the United States decrease military support for Pakistan?
- No Answer

15. Should the United States be involved in bringing an end to the violence in Darfur, Sudan?
- Yes

16. Should the United States be involved in bringing an end to the violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo?
- Yes

17. Should the United States provide economic and military support to the Transitional Government of Somalia?
- No Answer

18. Should the United States use sanctions to encourage the government of Zimbabwe to end its human rights abuses?
- Yes

19. Should the United States support the creation of an independent nation of Kosovo?
- No Answer

International Trade

Indicate which principles you support (if any) regarding international trade.

1. Do you support the United States imposing economic sanctions on China?
- No Answer

2. Do you support the United States imposing trade sanctions on Venezuela?
- No Answer

3. Do you support the United States involvement in free trade agreements?
- Yes

4. Do you support the United States involvement in intergovernmental organizations dedicated to trade?
- Yes

5. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Articles

Remarks by Vice President Pence at Reception in Honor of the Prime Minister of the Hellenic Republic

Jan. 18

VICE PRESIDENT PENCE: Would you join me in thanking the Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, for he and his wife's wonderful hospitality here at the State Department? (Applause.) Thank you, Mr. Secretary. To Mr. Prime Minister Mitsotakis; your wonderful bride; distinguished members of Congress who are joining us here today; to Ambassador Haris Lalakos; and most especially, on behalf of my wife Karen and I, who have come to love the Greek American community: Welcome to all the great Greek Americans who join us here tonight. (Applause.) But Prime Minister Mitsotakis, it is a great honor to be a part of America's welcome, welcoming you back to the United States to celebrate the unbreakable bonds between our country -- bonds that have been forged in history and heritage, bonds built on a shared love of freedom, and bonds built between families -- Greek families that came to this country and, from the very founding of this nation, have contributed immeasurably to the life of this nation and still represent the core of what binds us together. As the Secretary just reflected, as the President reflected in the Oval Office with you today, I am proud to report firsthand that, thanks to your leadership and the leadership of President Donald Trump, the bonds between the United States of America and Greece have never been stronger. (Applause.) Last year alone, our two nations engaged in nearly $3 billion in trade. But it's not economic exchange that defines us. It's really a shared philosophy of government. I saw the energy between you and President Trump yesterday in the Oval Office. I saw the friendship between you. And I also saw the common purpose, as Secretary Pompeo just reflected, in President Trump and in you, Prime Minister Mitsotakis. They are two leaders who believe that when you let people keep more of what they earn, when you roll back red tape, when you make government more efficient and you drive low-cost energy, making it available to job creators, economies proposer. And America and Greece are prospering thanks to your leadership and the leadership of President Donald Trump. (Applause.) Our economy is booming. Unemployment in the United States is at a 50-year low. More Americans are working than ever before. And under your leadership, at a time of slow growth around the world, the unemployment rate in Greece is at its lowest level in more than eight years. And we congratulate you, Mr. Prime Minister. (Applause.) I can't help but reflect, in this historic building, about the ties that have always bound our two nations. The Founding Fathers of our country recognized that Americans would be heirs of the achievements of Greek civilization. We would carry the ideals -- the love for freedom and democracy -- here. It was on a hill in Athens that the world's first democratic assemblies were gathered more than 2,500 years ago. And while the Secretary talked about his vacation travels last fall -- (laughter) -- I can tell you that, before I got this job, Mrs. Pence and I traveled to Athens, spent some time on the Acropolis, and had a lot less company than I have these days. (Laughter.) But we loved being in Greece, and I look forward to the day that I am able to return. (Applause.) t's amazing -- from that historic past, so carefully cherished and preserved by the Greek people -- that, two millennia later, a tiny alliance of people on a distant coast rose up against the world's strongest empire. To no less extent, they were inspired by the way the Greek people had led a small alliance of cities to stand up for freedom against impossible odds on the plains of Marathon and at the narrow pass of Thermopylae. They spoke of it. They wrote about it. Our Founding Fathers cherished it. Thomas Jefferson would say, "To the ancient Greeks, we are all indebted for the light which led… [us] out of… darkness." (Applause.) And, in 1821, when it came time for Greeks to fight for their independence against the odds once again, they inspired a freedom-loving people around the world, including here in America. It's no small wonder that a great champion of human freedom -- my second-favorite President, Ronald Reagan -- (applause) -- began the tradition of celebrating Greek Independence Day in the White House. And I'm proud to say that President Donald Trump has continued that tradition for the past three years, and so we always shall. (Applause.) Our nations share an incredible history. But it really is obvious to me, particularly being in the Oval Office yesterday, seeing the connection between you and President Trump -- two energetic leaders with a conviction and a belief in freedom, and a drive to be able to put it into practice to improve people's lives -- that the best is yet to come. So, on behalf of the American people, in celebration of the economic partnerships, the military partnerships, and the deep heritage between our two nations, allow me to join with all of you to raise a glass. Raise a glass -- PRIME MINISTER MITSOTAKIS: I'll grab the ouzo, now. VICE PRESIDENT PENCE: Yeah. I wondered what that was. Let me raise a glass -- (laughter) -- to -- (laughs) -- now I know your preference. (Laughter.) Raise a glass to Prime Minister Mitsotakis, to his wonderful wife, to the people of Greece, to Greek Americans, and to the enduring friendship between the United States of America and Greece. Yamas. (Applause.) (A toast is offered.) And now, would you all join me in welcoming Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis to the United States of America and the Department of State? (Applause.) END 6:30 P.M. EST

Remarks by President Trump in a Roundtable Discussion on the Governors' Initiative on Regulatory Innovation

Jan. 18

2:53 P.M. EST THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much, everybody. We've had a very big day in the stock market today, as you know. That will be 133 days where we set a new record. And that's fantastic. Our jobs numbers have come in fantastically well -- really well. And we're with some of our great governors and other leaders of areas of our country that are doing incredible things. We're talking about a lot of deregulation. We're talking about various tax cuts and various tax incentives so they continue onward with what they're doing. But this is a meeting that was set up and was set up a while ago. And I think they're very happy about the fact that we have cut regulations like nobody in the history of our country. We have -- in less than three years, we've cut more regulations than any President for their full term, or terms -- or, in one case, it's beyond two terms. We know who that is, Asa, right? (Laughter.) In one case, you had a little longer than the eight. And we've cut more than any President ever, and we're going to cut a lot more. And we have a -- we wanted to do one for two, and we're going to be probably one for ten or twelve by the time we finish. I think we're at about one for eight right now. So we've done some things that are pretty -- pretty amazing. We have a lot of military areas represented at the table. And those areas are doing very well; they're thriving too. As an example: Alaska. But they're really thriving. And our whole country is thriving. It's thriving like never before. The jobs numbers are incredible -- best in 51 years. And I think soon we're going to be able to say "historic." If we go a little bit lower, we'll say, "In the history of our country, the best job numbers." With African Americans, with Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans we actually have the best in the history of our country. Best job numbers, best unemployment numbers, and the best employment numbers too. There is a slight difference. More people are working today in the United States than at any time ever in our history. We were almost up to 160 million people; we've never been close. So that's something really good. I think what we'll do is we're going to go around the room quickly and say a few words about the area represented or the state represented. And I'll start off with our great Vice President, Mike Pence, and then we'll go around perhaps. Governor, we'll start with you, okay? THE VICE PRESIDENT: Thank you, Mr. President. And great to welcome not only members of our Cabinet, but really some of the most accomplished governors in the country to the table -- people that have been leading in what you have defined as the Governors' Initiative on Regulatory Innovation. At the outset of this administration, you committed to revive the American economy. As you said, Mr. President, we cut taxes across the board for working families and businesses large and small. We've fought for free and fairer trade with deals that were just announced and headed to the floor: the USMCA next week, phase one on China, the Korea deal. We've worked to expand access to American energy. But it's been the regulatory initiative that you made a priority in this administration early on that's also been driving 7 million jobs created by businesses large and small. And that record unemployment rate that you challenged us to work with governors around the country to make sure that states were also replicating the deregulatory effort that you initiated here at the federal level. And we have gathered here some of the -- some of the real champions of regulatory relief, of people that have been doing it. And the governor-elect from Mississippi has -- in his role at lieutenant governor, has been a champion of regulatory reform. And so today, really, is about how we keep the momentum in the economy by encouraging even a greater partnership on freeing up the American people to create jobs and create wealth and opportunity. And I know they're all grateful for your leadership, Mr. President, but I know how grateful you are for the governors gathered around here and all those that they represent who have been taking the principles you put into practice here, at our nation's capital, and putting them into practice at the local and state level to create jobs and opportunities for Americans. THE PRESIDENT: Good. Thank you, Mike, very much. Brad? GOVERNOR LITTLE: Mr. President, following your leadership, my first executive order was the "two for one" -- that for every new rule, we give up two. I did pretty well. THE PRESIDENT: You did well. GOVERNOR LITTLE: I exceeded that by 4,000 percent. (Laughter.) We got rid of 82 rules for every new rule we're implementing this year. THE PRESIDENT: That's fantastic. That's great. GOVERNOR LITTLE: But it -- the whole effort of what it does, of reducing the friction costs, particularly startup and small businesses, and, you know, people that have a tougher time -- THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR LITTLE: -- washing away that regulatory friction at both the federal level and the state level is a lot of that job creation. It's just -- and it's a gift that keeps on giving. If you keep being diligent on it -- THE PRESIDENT: That's right. GOVERNOR LITTLE: -- is that -- that atmosphere for people to be successful -- the great American story of entrepreneurial-ship -- only happens if you reduce regulatory friction. And whether it's in licensing, which we're working on -- about doing away with licensing requirements and making it to where military spouses don't have to go over a hurdle when they transfer from one state to another, or whether it's just rules to start. And then, when you get done, you got to make sure that it doesn't build back up. THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR LITTLE: So we look forward to continuing to work with your administration on this. THE PRESIDENT: Good. Great job. Thank you very much, Brad. Pete? GOVERNOR RICKETTS: Well, Mr. President, thank you again for leading on the regulatory reform. It's really a key thing, especially things -- when you get rid of job-killing things like the Waters of the U.S. THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR RICKETTS: What you've been doing on occupational licensing reform -- that's a big thing we've been working on in Nebraska as well. And just, it impacts so many people's lives when you do that. So, for example, we have a woman who wanted to open up her own hair-braiding business in her home. But because of the rules and regulations in Nebraska, she would have had to have 2,100 hours of licensing -- you know, classrooms to be able to get that license. THE PRESIDENT: That's a long time. GOVERNOR RICKETTS: And now maybe I don't get the whole hair-braiding thing -- (laughter) -- but nobody's health or safety is put at risk by bad hair-braiding. And so one of the things we did is we took -- you know, got rid of that requirement so she wouldn't have to have that license so she could open up her own business -- THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR RICKETTS: -- and be able to help add jobs to the economy. And that's one of the things that your administration supported. So thank you very much for that. We really appreciate it. And we're continuing -- I signed an executive order freezing all regulatory rulemaking until the regulations have been reviewed. We were able, for example, to cut the amount of regulation by 59 percent -- our Department of Environment and Energy. We're working with your Federal Highway Administration, so we're taking over the NEPA reviews. And that's going to allow us to be able to get those environmental reviews done faster, still with your oversight. But we're one of eight states that's done that. I'd love to say we're the smallest state, but Alaska actually has that distinction as being the smallest state doing that. But that's an example of how we're doing it. And then, just process improvement, trying to make sure that we're doing a good job of getting these things turned around quickly. We've saved about 300 hours of our teammates' time, but what it's allowed to do is be able to turn around permits in a third of the time it was taking before. So all this is really helping to, again, get rid of that friction that Brad was talking about so that people and average Americans can get about their lives and go about creating the prosperity that we've experienced under your administration. THE PRESIDENT: Any word on the pipeline permits? GOVERNOR RICKETTS: So, we're -- actually, TC Energy right now is going through getting the easements for all the landholders that they hadn't come to agreements with yet. And, of course, we're still waiting on the lawsuit in Montana. But I expect that that's -- there's going to be more action on that next year. THE PRESIDENT: All right. Good. Thank you very much, Pete. Please. Thank you. CHAIRMAN SAGE: I'd like to thank you. It is an honor to be here today, Mr. President and Mr. Vice President. I don't know if anybody is -- or everybody is all familiar with where I'm from. I'm from the Southern Ute Indiana reservation in the southwest part of Colorado. We take a lot of pride in our culture and our heritage. What we have, we'd like to set an example for Indian Country. THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. Thank you. CHAIRMAN SAGE: Thank you. THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. Please. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: Mr. President, thank you very much for what you're doing. And I want you to know that what you're doing not only makes a difference in New Mexico -- which we appreciate -- I know, from earlier conversations, it makes a difference all over the nation. THE PRESIDENT: Right. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: New Mexico lives and breathes oil and gas. We're your third-largest oil producer, sixth-largest natural gas producer. In the last two years, we had $2 billion of surplus revenue to that state because of this industry. It's been amazing. God willing, we'll have $174 billion of capital invested in this industry over the next couple of years. We have a lot of opportunities. THE PRESIDENT: So what's going to happen when they want to shut you down? STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: Well, we're banking on you, Mr. President. (Laughter.) THE PRESIDENT: You better bank on me. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: We're banking on you. THE PRESIDENT: You're my friend, Jim. You have no choice. (Laughter.) STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: It's a great honor to know that we have back-stock for what we're trying to do. And I can tell you that -- THE PRESIDENT: It's true. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: -- there's a whole bunch of folks out there that understand the risk associated with the oil and gas business. What they have trouble with is the risk associated with the politics. THE PRESIDENT: That's right. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: And what you're doing is removing that risk, allowing us to deploy capital and make a lot of money for the nation, for our country, for our state, and our city. We're growing like -- I mean, unbelievably. I mean, the Permian and the Delaware are just prolific. And recently, I had dinner with a lady that's over the Lower 48, for a major company. She told me that only about 10 percent of those reserves currently are being tapped with technology. THE PRESIDENT: Right. That's what I hear. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: So you can just imagine what's in front of us with a little entrepreneurship. So -- THE PRESIDENT: And we're doing well out there, I understand. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: Yeah, it's pretty nice right now. We appreciate it. Thank you very much. THE PRESIDENT: That's good. Thank you very much, Jim. Please. Asa? GOVERNOR HUTCHINSON: Well, Mr. President, first of all, congratulations on both USMCA -- THE PRESIDENT: Yeah. GOVERNOR HUTCHINSON: -- but also the first phase of the China trade. That is, as you know, very important to my farmers in Arkansas, but also our -- we're a global export in a lot of different areas. And so, that trade is very important to us. Congratulations to you. That's -- keep at it. And then to -- secondly, thanks for your leadership on regulatory reform. The fact that you and the Vice President have taken a leadership role -- and it makes it easier whenever it comes to getting general assembly, legislative support -- the public becomes more aware of this. And so we've made it a priority. It does impact the economy when we can reduce the burden of regulations and delays. Just in the air permitting -- which is required, of course, for a manufacturing facility -- we have reduced the wait time for an air permit by 600 days. Now, that's just startling to think that there would be that kind of a backlog. But that's the kind of process improvement that helps industry either get a yes or a no more quickly. And then we've taken on, of course, the licensure reform to help those that are coming into the state. And your leadership on that has been very important. So -- THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, Asa. GOVERNOR HUTCHINSON: -- thank you. THE PRESIDENT: You're doing a great job. Great job. Gene? SECRETARY SCALIA: Well, Mr. President, as you know, just a little more than a week ago, we had this just extraordinary jobs report yet again. THE PRESIDENT: Yeah. SECRETARY SCALIA: The market-watchers, the experts were saying we'd add about 180,000 jobs, which is a good number, and we just blew that out of the water with 266,000 additional jobs, and then adding 41 [thousand] for September and October. THE PRESIDENT: Right. SECRETARY SCALIA: Just another great month. But, as the Vice President said, we have to maintain that momentum. We can't rest content with what's going on right now. We need to continue to look for ways to improve the economy. The USMCA is something that you and the Vice President and others have been championing as part of that solution for a long time. But de-reg is such a good issue for you and the Vice President and others to be bringing out to the states. The jobs market that we're experiencing, it didn't just come about; there are reasons for it. And deregulation, as you've led it, is one of the prime reasons the states now can be examples of leadership as well. And as Governor Hutchinson mentioned, occupational licensing -- these requirements that you have a specialized license that varies from state to state -- we're very concerned about military spouses. The soldier moves from state to state, and the spouse comes along. Military spouses move from state to state seven times as much as average Americans. So this is a real burden on them. It's a burden on their families, who are already sacrificing so much. And so we've been working with the states and others, and with the Second Lady as well, in trying to address that problem. THE PRESIDENT: Very good. Thank you very much, Gene. And I have to say, Governor-elect Tate Reeves, he -- we spent a couple of days with you and -- governor-elect of a wonderful state, Mississippi. And he won, and he won easily. It was a tough race, it was a tight race, and people were watching it closely. And when he won easily, they don't cover it. Why don't they -- why is that? (Laughter.) They didn't mention a thing. But that's okay; they know in your state. But you're going to do a fantastic job, and we appreciate you being here, Tate. Congratulations. That was a great race. You really ran a great one. It was pretty even, and he won by seven -- and won by a lot. And we appreciate you being here. Go ahead, please. GOVERNOR-ELECT REEVES: Well, thank you, Mr. President. And as a good mutual friend of ours says, these guys behind us don't ever cover airplanes that land safely. (Laughter.) THE PRESIDENT: I guess. I guess, yeah. Can I use it? GOVERNOR-ELECT REEVES: The reality is that -- and Secretary Scalia said this, which I think is very important -- these job numbers, these -- lowest unemployment rate in Mississippi's history, in America's history -- THE PRESIDENT: Yeah. GOVERNOR-ELECT REEVES: The highest employment rate -- we actually have 88,000 more people working in Mississippi today than was working eight years ago. And what's important to note is: These things don't just happen. It's not just happenstance. It's the fact that good policies work. They work for Mississippi's economy and they work for America's economy. And so I just want to thank you very much for your leadership on regulatory reform, your leadership on cutting taxes, your leadership on lowering regulations, your leadership on the trade deals. It's making a difference in my state, and it's making a difference across the country. And thank you and to the Vice President for everything that you're doing. I look forward to working with you for the next four years. THE PRESIDENT: Good job. Good job, Tate. GOVERNOR-ELECT REEVES: Thank you. THE PRESIDENT: Appreciate it. Russ? You want to say something? ACTING DIRECTOR VOUGHT: Yeah, I just wanted to build on the momentum of where we are. So, in the first three years, the President has been able to lower regulatory costs by $50 billion over three years. We're going to double that in the year 2020. What that looks like is about $220 billion of savings to the economy per year, so substantial growth from deregulatory initiatives. That's about $3,100 per family that's going to benefit when we're all said and done -- when the President and the Vice President are all said and done -- of real money in households' pockets. That looks like about three mortgage payments. That's about the size of a family's entire gas bill for the year. So this is real money, real benefit, and it's only just begun. THE PRESIDENT: Great. Thank you very much. Eric? GOVERNOR HOLCOMB: Well, let me pile on the praise and tell you why it's so easy to do so, in terms of a few Indiana indicators. When the Vice President handed me the keys in Indiana, we were heading in the right direction -- humming along. But since that period of time, we just closed -- we just -- our budget committee just threw out our revenue numbers for the first five months of the year. We're $200 million-plus above where it was projected to be. We got about 13.9 percent in our cash reserves. THE PRESIDENT: That's great. Wow. GOVERNOR HOLCOMB: About $2.29 billion in cash reserves. We've got more people working, just like in Mississippi, than ever before in our state's history. We've tripled the foreign direct investment in the last three years. And so we are moving in the right direction. And it's because of -- as good as it was three years ago, it is great right now because of this partnership and because the tax and the regulatory environments work. THE PRESIDENT: Big difference. GOVERNOR HOLCOMB: Yeah. THE PRESIDENT: Big difference. GOVERNOR HOLCOMB: Huge. It is the difference. THE PRESIDENT: Great job you're doing. Thank you very much. David? SECRETARY BERNHARDT: Well, sir, we manage a lot of land. Some of that land is Indian land that we manage with the tribes. And so, today, Chairman Sage and I began a process with the rulemaking that will allow them to better define how they want to have their land managed, and then we'll approve a single permit that then they can manage the land going forward. So it's really exciting. Interior has been a leader in the deregulation effort. We've issued the second-most deregulatory number of regulations, and we've really punched above our weight, and our permitting times are down. And revenue for oil and gas is nearly double THE PRESIDENT: That's great. SECRETARY BERNHARDT: -- from where it was when the President took over. THE PRESIDENT: That's great. Thank you very much, David. Please, Governor, go ahead. GOVERNOR DUNLEAVY: Mr. President, it's a pleasure to be here. I want to thank you for all of things that you're doing. Because I don't think what people realize is that numbers don't lie; the numbers don't lie when you're talking about unemployment, investment, et cetera. And what you're doing for the country is, obviously, helping Alaska tremendously. Kind of far away, tucked up there in the north -- but we now have record unemployment in Alaska. Our GDP is up now two quarters in a row. Personal income is up higher than it's been in 10 years. More personal wealth is being created in Alaska. I also want to do a shout-out from the troops. I don't know if folks know this, but whenever the President flies over to Asia, he lands in Alaska and refuels. But unlike some others in the past, he gets out of the plane, and he goes and he meets the troops. And they talk about it all of the time. All of the time. THE PRESIDENT: It's true. Every time. Every time. GOVERNOR DUNLEAVY: And I get an opportunity to talk with the President. And it's not just a "BS" session, but it's about: What can we do to help Alaska? What's happening in your state? What do we need to work with? And I would say, Mr. President -- and I'm being honest -- I can't think of a President that's helped Alaska more than you have, with trying to deregulate a number of the projects that we've been working on, helping us gain a leg up again to be one of the top energy-producing states in the country. And I just want to thank you. And, in terms of regulation, in terms of helping the military spouses, we're doing our part. We're looking at 239 different regulations to either modify or roll back in over 100 professions. We have a large indigenous population in the state of Alaska. About 15 percent of our people are Alaska natives. And your work on -- working on missing indigenous women, your work on public safety, your work on opioids -- again, the numbers don't lie. You're doing a tremendous job. And I want to thank you on behalf of the people of Alaska, because what you're doing is helping us tremendously as well. THE PRESIDENT: And now logging -- we did a big thing on logging. GOVERNOR DUNLEAVY: Absolutely. (Inaudible.) THE PRESIDENT: And we did a very big thing on ANWR, which is potentially the biggest in the world. We'll see what it is ultimately, but it's potentially the biggest site in the world. So it'll be very interesting to see how that turns out. Great job. Thank you very much. Anybody else? Would anybody like to say? Would you like to say something? Go ahead. THE VICE PRESIDENT: Senator Obhof. STATE SENATOR OBHOF: Thank you, Mr. President. THE PRESIDENT: Thanks, Senator. STATE SENATOR OBHOF: First of all, I think we've heard some people say congratulations on the USMCA. I'd like to congratulate you, too. But, more importantly, I'd like to thank you for keeping your promises to the people of this country -- that when you said you would renegotiate NAFTA, you did so. And we appreciate the follow-through. Ohio is doing great right now. Our employment numbers are good. We're running a surplus as well. But we're also following your lead on regulatory reforms. So, in the state budget that Governor DeWine signed this past summer, we adopted the "one in, two out" rule. We actually passed legislation in the last week related to military spouses so that they can get reciprocity and get working quicker. And we have new legislation that was just introduced -- similar to what has happened in Arizona -- that would, for many areas of occupational licensure, grant reciprocity from other states. THE PRESIDENT: And you have a lot of car company expansions, and you're doing really good. STATE SENATOR OBHOF: We've had some very good news in Lordstown in the last few weeks. THE PRESIDENT: I know that. I know it very -- I've been pushing it very hard. That's good. Kristi? GOVERNOR NOEM: Yes, Mr. President. First of all, thank you for making your senior staff available to us today. We sat down for an hour and a half, and it was just really nice to have a give-and-take -- THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR NOEM: -- and really hear from them some of the details of things that we can dig further into, things that you're doing that maybe we won't have time to discuss right here. But also from -- on behalf of South Dakota, thank you for the trade agreements. You know, we have had the largest natural disaster in our state's history this year. We have more unplanted acres than any other state in the nation, and we've been devastated. So I've been tightening our belt. But these trade agreements, on a tough year where farmers are struggling, to have that good news come right before Christmas -- THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR NOEM: -- really did help them quite a bit. And you never quit, which -- I love that you did it until you got it done and you won. And, by turn, we get to win because we're going to get to keep our family farms and we're going to get to keep South Dakota wonderful. And so I appreciate that. THE PRESIDENT: It's a great place. And you also are going to have a very exciting Fourth of July. GOVERNOR NOEM: We are. We're going to have fireworks. THE PRESIDENT: Right. GOVERNOR NOEM: And I'm hoping you will -- THE PRESIDENT: For many years -- for many years, the fireworks -- GOVERNOR NOEM: -- you will come -- at Mount Rushmore. THE PRESIDENT: Well, we're going to think about it. Mount Rushmore. They ended the fireworks. How many years ago? A long time. GOVERNOR NOEM: Gosh, it was at least 10 years ago. So -- THE PRESIDENT: Nobody knows why, but you just couldn't have it. And now you're going to have fireworks. And the Governor called, and she said, "You got to do me a favor." Right? GOVERNOR NOEM: And you did. THE PRESIDENT: And we worked it out. And we got it done. And you're going to have fireworks. And I appreciate what you said on the trade deals. They're incredible deals. GOVERNOR NOEM: They are. THE PRESIDENT: And they're big. And they're big. And every once in a while, you'll hear a critic. There's never been deals like this made. But you have some globalists -- you know, they want us to lose money. Sometimes you have a globalist get on -- I watch it: "Who cares about the United States? Let's lose money." I'm the opposite. When I have deficits -- I don't like deficits. You have some people that don't mind deficits. The deficits -- I don't like factories closing and plants closing in this country, going to another country, taking our jobs. So, I've never really been one to want to put up with it even. I've been watching it for -- it's probably one of the reasons I'm President. I've watched that for so many years, where your factories and your plants all over -- whether it's Indiana or any other state. Even you, Asa. Right? I mean, once and a while, they'll close one over there. But it was -- the fact is, I would watch as they close plants, everybody gets fired. They move to Mexico or some other place, including China. And, in China, they don't move; they just buy the product. And some people are happy. But, no, not me. We keep our jobs. They're moving back. The agreement is very tough. The USMCA is very, very tough. It's very hard to move. Economically, it makes it really prohibitive to get out. And it was very important to me. But no, I'm not a globalist. I love this country, and we're going to take care of our country. The deal with China is a massive deal, from a manufacturing standpoint. But the farmers -- I mean, the farmers, I guess, maybe will be the -- GOVERNOR NOEM: They will. THE PRESIDENT: -- biggest beneficiary of all. You see that already. GOVERNOR NOEM: Yes. THE PRESIDENT: And China has already started to buy. I told them -- four, five weeks ago it looked like we were going to get to a deal. I said, "Start buying now. You're going to start buying now." And they did. And they were doing a lot of business with the farmers and China. And so the deal will be finalized over the next couple of weeks. It's actually -- translation is the biggest thing. The deal was finished, but the translation is very important. (Laughter.) I said, "Make sure you have the right translators." Because you can lose a lot with bad translation. GOVERNOR NOEM: That's true. THE PRESIDENT: So we're working on getting that done, but it's going to be a really a big -- GOVERNOR NOEM: Thank you. THE PRESIDENT: -- it's going to be a -- and I think you already see it. I think most of you see that now with China, right? They've already come in and they're buying -- they're buying very big. So, anyway. We have a tremendously successful country. I think, economically, it's the most successful it's ever been. Our military is totally rebuilt. Our vets are being taken care of. We have Choice and we have Accountability. You know, people don't talk about Accountability. We had a situation in Arizona where you couldn't fire people. They did horrible things and you couldn't fire them. Now you can fire them. And it took -- 55 years, they've been trying to get that approved and they couldn't. And we got it approved. That means that -- people are bad, they don't treat our vets well, they don't treat them with respect -- they get fired. That's the way it is. And more than 8,000 people have been let go that were -- were not good for us, were not good for the vets. And they've been trying to do this for decades and they couldn't get it. So we got Accountability done. And we have Choice done. Choice is a big deal. From your standpoint, it's a big -- most of you -- all of you have big vet areas -- everyone in this room. But now you can -- you can tell somebody, if he's got to wait two weeks to see a doctor -- or four weeks or nine weeks, in some cases; it's the craziest thing -- you go right outside, you see a doctor -- a local doctor. You pick the doctor. We pay the bill. And they get -- they're better. We've had cases where they had to wait so long. They were just -- not very sick. Pretty routine stuff. They end up terminally ill because they couldn't get to see a doctor. So we finally got Choice done. And they've been trying that one for 44 years. For 44 years, they've been trying to get Choice done. And we got it done. So, the vets are very happy with us. Big on Second Amendment. This is a big Second Amendment group. I think, for the most part, I can say that. I don't think anybody is going to raise their hand and fight me on that one, Jim. STATE REPRESENTATIVE TOWNSEND: (Laughs.) No. THE PRESIDENT: But this is a big Second Amendment room -- these governors, every one of them. And we're very strong on our Second Amendment. So, our country is doing fantastically well. Thank you all very much. Thank you very much. Q Mr. President, are you concerned about North Korea at all right now -- the developments in North Korea? THE PRESIDENT: We're watching it. We'll see. I'd be disappointed if something would be in the works. And if it is, we'll take care of it. But we'll see. We're watching it very closely. We're watching North Korea -- we're watching many places, actually, very closely. But North Korea, we are watching very closely. Q Mr. President, how much has Giuliani shared with you about his recent trip to Ukraine? THE PRESIDENT: Oh, not too much, but he's a very great crime fighter. He was probably the greatest crime fighter over the last 50 years. Very smart. He was the best mayor in the history of the city of New York. He's a great person who loves our country. And he does this out of love, believe me. He does it out of love. He sees what goes on. He sees what's happening. He sees all of the hoax that happens when they talk about impeachment hoax or the Russian collusion delusion. And he sees it and he's a -- he's a great gentleman. And he was, again, the greatest mayor in the history of New York, and probably the greatest crime fighter in the last 50 years. He knows what he's doing. Thank you very much, everybody. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. END 3:22 P.M. EST

The Detroit News - The Time Has Come. Congress, Pass USMCA.

Jan. 18

By Mike Pence As vice president I've had the opportunity to travel all across this country and meet Americans from all walks of life. Literally everywhere I go, the American people tell me that they couldn't be more proud of the progress that this country has made under the leadership of President Donald Trump. As a candidate, the president promised to fight for policies that put American jobs and American workers first, and from the first days of this administration, he has delivered. As a result, today America is stronger and more prosperous than ever before. Since the day Trump was elected, businesses large and small have created 7 million American jobs. Wages are rising at the fastest pace in 10 years, and disposable income for the average American household has skyrocketed by more than $5,000 a year. Trump has achieved these results in the face of historic obstruction. Rather than focusing on the needs of the people they were elected to represent, congressional Democrats have spent the last three years on endless investigations in an attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 election. Despite their partisan impeachment, Trump has remained focused on how to keep our economy growing, and he negotiated the largest trade deal in American history, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. The U.S. International Trade Commission says that within five years, the USMCA could add up to $235 billion in new economic growth and 589,000 jobs to the U.S. economy. The USMCA will put in place the strongest and most comprehensive labor protections of any trade agreement in American history. The USMCA will also remove unfair restrictions on America's farmers so they can sell more products to Canada. And finally, the deal's new rules on intellectual property will better protect American businesses and innovators, and will serve as a template for future trade deals. The USMCA makes a strong statement to the world that the era of U.S. economic surrender is over, and that if other countries want access to the most prosperous economy in the history of the world, then they have to give American workers access to their markets, too. In stark contrast to the Democrats' partisan impeachment, the USMCA will benefit Americans of every political party and every background. Since the president negotiated the USMCA more than a year ago, I've visited dozens of businesses, factories, and farms across America, and one of the most rewarding things I saw was Democrats responding to their constituents to put partisan politics aside and support the USMCA. I remember standing before the behemoth Caterpillar trucks in Arizona, and seeing the excitement of their employees, who know that the USMCA is going to expand their digital trade and create more jobs. I can still see the look in the eyes of Ford auto workers in Michigan as I told them that we would finally end NAFTA and raise autoworker wages even higher. I can still hear the roar of more than one thousand workers at Manitowoc Cranes in Pennsylvania when I said that the USMCA will create nearly 50,000 American manufacturing jobs. With limited time on the congressional calendar before the end of 2019, the clock is ticking. But now more than a year after the president negotiated the USMCA, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her party have finally acquiesced to the will of the American people and agreed to bring it before the Congress and give it a vote. While Democrats have spent most of 2019 on endless investigations, passing the USMCA is a step they can take to finally start working with the president to serve the American people. It's time for Congress to pass it so that Trump can sign it into law, and it can create jobs and opportunity for Americans all across our country. Mike Pence is vice president of the United States. This op-ed appeared in The Detroit News on December 11, 2019.

Voter Guide

View