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Quick Facts
Personal Details

Shelly L. Hettleman is a Democratic member of the Maryland House of Delegates, representing District 11. She was first elected to the chamber in 2014. Hettleman is running for re-election in the primary on June 26, 2018. The general election will take place on November 6, 2018.

Education

  • BA, Political Science, Northwestern University, 1986

Professional Experience

  • BA, Political Science, Northwestern University, 1986
  • Co-Founder/Director of Public Policy, Parent Action
  • Campaign Director, Ben Carlin for Senate, 2007-2013
  • Program Director, Counseling, Helpline & Aid Network for Abused Women, CHANA, 1995-2000
  • Legislative Assistant, Congressman Ben Carlin, 1987-1990

Political Experience

  • BA, Political Science, Northwestern University, 1986
  • Co-Founder/Director of Public Policy, Parent Action
  • Campaign Director, Ben Carlin for Senate, 2007-2013
  • Program Director, Counseling, Helpline & Aid Network for Abused Women, CHANA, 1995-2000
  • Legislative Assistant, Congressman Ben Carlin, 1987-1990
  • Senator, Maryland State Senate, District 11, 2020-present
  • Delegate, Maryland State House of Delegates, District 11, 2015-2020
  • Appointed by Governor Larry Hogan, Senator, Maryland State Senate, District 11, January 30th, 2020

Former Committees/Caucuses

Former Co-Chair, Audit and Evaluation Committee, Maryland State House of Delegates

Former Member, Joint Audit Committee, Maryland State House of Delegates

Former Member, Study Group on Economic Security, Maryland State House of Delegates

Member, Appropriations Committee, Maryland State House of Delegates, 2015-2020

Member, Ending Homelessness Committee, Maryland State House of Delegates, 2015-2020

Member, Oversight Committee on Personnel, Maryland State House of Delegates, 2015-2020

Member, Subcommittee on Education and Economic Development, Maryland State House of Delegates, 2015-2020

Current Legislative Committees

Member, Judicial Proceedings

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

  • BA, Political Science, Northwestern University, 1986
  • Co-Founder/Director of Public Policy, Parent Action
  • Campaign Director, Ben Carlin for Senate, 2007-2013
  • Program Director, Counseling, Helpline & Aid Network for Abused Women, CHANA, 1995-2000
  • Legislative Assistant, Congressman Ben Carlin, 1987-1990
  • Senator, Maryland State Senate, District 11, 2020-present
  • Delegate, Maryland State House of Delegates, District 11, 2015-2020
  • Appointed by Governor Larry Hogan, Senator, Maryland State Senate, District 11, January 30th, 2020
  • Member, Commission on the Future of the Pikesville Armory, 2017-present
  • Board of Directors, Maryland Corps Program, 2016-present
  • Senior Planner, Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore
  • Director of Government Relations, Baltimore Jewish Council
  • Member, Board of Directors, Chizuk Amuno Congregation
  • Co-Leader, Maryland Democratic Party Coordinated Campaign
  • President, Parents’ Association
  • Co-Founder, Weaving Women’s Words: Baltimore Stories for the Jewish Women’s Archives
  • Member, Commission to Review Maryland's Use of Assessments and Testing in Public Schools, 2015-2016
  • Campaign Manager, Cardin for Senate, 2007-2013
  • Parents' Association Board, The Park School, 2006-2012
  • Board of Trustees, The Park School, 2008-2010

Other Info

— Awards:

  • Maryland Association of Youth Service Bureaus, Cornerstone Award, 2017

Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence, Annual Legislative Award, 2017

Articles

Issue Position: Jobs and Economic Development

Jan. 1, 2018

Good jobs and a productive economy are at the heart of almost all the good things that we want for our families and communities. Good jobs support strong families. On the other hand, the lack of good jobs -- as a result of unemployment or underemployment -- causes great stress on families while depriving them of the essentials of daily life. What can be done? To a great extent, jobs and economic development are dependent upon private enterprise and public policies that are national in scope. New technologies are a vital part of the landscape, and so are "green jobs" that improve our environment and economy. At the same time, states can do more than they now do, both on their own and in partnership with businesses and other levels of government. Several principles should guide our efforts in Maryland and Baltimore County. We must assure an environment in which the private sector can grow and create new jobs. We must nurture what a report by The Abell Foundation calls the "entrepreneurial ecosystem," searching out innovators and investors, and creating a healthy business climate. For us to gain and keep a competitive edge, we must work closely with business leaders and provide stable and reasonable regulatory policies, a fair tax structure, excellent transportation and other infrastructure, and a diverse, well-trained workforce. Maryland has many vibrant private and public sectors and advantages to build on. Still, for the strength of our community and accelerated job growth, our public schools, as good as they are, must be better. We should aspire to a public school system that is a model throughout the country. Students must be taught the higher-order thinking skills required in today's higher-tech economy. Career and technology programs must be tailored to fit the needs of Maryland employers. Our colleges and universities also are a source of great strength, both to lead in the research that will grow jobs and to prepare students to fill the jobs. For example, our District's own Stevenson University is blazing a bright path in training a new generation of workers who will be ready to adapt as jobs and workplaces change. Another foundation for job growth is regional cooperation. This applies not just to workforce development and infrastructure but to the recreational and cultural amenities that heavily influence company decisions about location. While job growth is crucial, we must not stop there. We must also assure that jobs provide decent wages and benefits. I support an increase in the minimum wage, and indexing it to inflation. Attempts in Congress to raise the minimum wage are stalled, but about 20 states have higher minimum wages than Maryland. In buying power, the minimum wage is much lower than it was in the 1960's. A nonpartisan institute estimates that over 530,000 Maryland workers will benefit from raising the minimum wage to about $10 per hour. Research shows that raising the minimum wage has little if any adverse impact on employment. Moreover, good jobs must be equally accessible to all. We must continue to remove barriers that hamper women, minorities and others experiencing discrimination from gaining good jobs and earning job promotions.

Issue Position: Our Debt to Seniors

Jan. 1, 2018

As a community and state, we do a lot for our seniors but not all that we should. Those who have worked so hard to create the world we enjoy and to whom we owe so much should be paid back with our love, our respect and a continuum of services that enable them to live vibrantly as they age. We are blessed that the community of seniors is increasing: the number of seniors over 85 has tripled in the last 10 years and will continue to grow dramatically. But their needs are multiplying too, and becoming more complex. This dynamic causes increasing challenges for our seniors and places difficult responsibilities on their families, including the "sandwich generation." Even the most caring families can't do it all by themselves. There must be a range of resources and programs that support the variety of choices that seniors should be able to make as they age. First, there must be available, affordable home & community services. We all want to live independently as long as possible. Seniors are eager, willing and able to participate in a variety of social, cultural, educational and wellness activities, as well as paid and volunteer work. The recession hit our older workers hard and many require skill development to ensure that they are marketable in today's economy. Our younger seniors came of age in an era of tremendous social transformation; government can play a role in encouraging their energy and desire to give back in productive ways. As time goes by, many seniors will begin to want or need additional support. Many seniors will benefit from various forms of in-home assistance from professional home care providers. The state's Medicaid waiver program that provides reimbursement for non-nursing home services must be increased: thousands of seniors are on the waiting list. Some seniors will look for or need to consider housing options designed specifically for them. We need to be sure that there are adequate high quality housing options offering a continuum of appropriate supportive services levels at all income levels. At a minimum, there must be affordable, assisted living that accommodates the progression to more intensive care for physical and mental health conditions. This includes the needs of those with Alzheimer's disease. The 2013 report of the Maryland Commission on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders contains important recommendations. There are many things we can do to make our communities more senior-friendly. I will work in partnership with community groups representing seniors to identify both low-cost and higher-investment ways to improve their lives and living conditions. Also many in-home necessities can be met by volunteers who can help with transportation, food purchases, technology support, handyman help and other basics of daily living. A promising approach that organizes and supports such volunteer programs is the successful "village model" underway in several Baltimore area communities. I will support efforts to expand the model through both public funding and philanthropic support. We stand on the shoulders of our seniors. Our duty now is to stand taller and step up to these challenges.

Issue Position: Early Child Care and Parenting

Jan. 1, 2018

The quality of family and neighborhood life often depends on the care that children get between birth (including prenatal care) and age 5. Because of how children develop in the earliest years -- for example, 90% of brain growth occurs before age 5 -- early childhood care and education are critical. Government is no substitute for what families should be able to do for themselves. But some families are less able than others, and children, for their own sake and for the wellbeing of our communities, must be assured a healthy, nurturing start. Several essential elements in early childhood care and education need attention: Home visiting programs -- in which trained professionals provide expectant parents and young families with parenting education and other help -- have been shown to make a big difference in the lives of the children and the families. They help to prevent child abuse and neglect. More investment in such programs is necessary.Child care must be available, high-quality and affordable. In 2012, about 80% of Maryland children under age 12 had mothers in the workforce. To meet the demand for child care, the waiting list for subsidy programs for families must be eliminated, and the decade-old reimbursement rates for providers must be increased.Head Start and pre-kindergarten programs must be expanded. And staff training must be enhanced, particularly so children receive the language acquisition and social skills that are keys to future school success.

Events

2020

Jan. 6
Shelly's 2020 Pre-Session Send Off Happy Hour

Mon 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EST

Earth, Wood & Fire - Baltimore Baltimore, MD

Oct. 13
New Date: Ice Cream & Cookies in the Park w/Shelly Hettleman

Sun 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT

Lake Roland, Pavilion 2