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Bernie Sanders

D

Twitter Followers: 10.4M

2019


Congress Bills
Biography

Personal

Political Experience

Current Legislative Committees

Professional Experience

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

Additional Information

Bernie Sanders is an independent member of the U.S. Senate from Vermont who caucuses with the Democratic Party.

Sanders announced that he was running for president of the United States for a second time on February 19, 2019. Sanders previously ran for the presidency in 2016, coming in second to Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary.

In 2018, Sanders won re-election to the U.S. Senate as a Democrat and as an independent. In his 2006 Senate election and his 2012 re-election, he won the Democratic primary and then declined the nomination ahead of the general election so he could appear on the ballot as an independent.

Sanders was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1991 to 2007.

Sanders regularly endorses candidates in races across the country. For more information about his endorsements, see this page.

Sanders was born in 1941 in Brooklyn, New York, where he grew up. He earned his B.A. in political science from the University of Chicago in 1964 and went on to lecture at Harvard University and Hamilton College in New York. Sanders has also worked as a carpenter and a journalist.

After spending six months in a kibbutz (a communal settlement) in Israel, Sanders moved to Vermont in 1968. In the 1970s, he ran unsuccessfully for governor of Vermont twice and for U.S. Senate twice as a Liberty Union Party candidate. He was elected mayor of Burlington as an independent in 1981, defeating Democratic incumbent Gordon Paquette by a margin of 10 votes, and he served as mayor until 1989.

During his mayoral tenure, Sanders ran unsuccessful bids for governor and U.S. House as an independent before being elected to the House in 1990, where he served until joining the U.S. Senate in 2007.

Sanders sought the Democratic nomination for president in 2016, which he lost to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He received around 43 percent of the popular vote in the primaries compared to Clinton's 55 percent, and he received support from 39 percent of delegates at the national convention to Clinton's 60 percent.

Though Sanders has held elected office as an independent since 1981 and sought the Democratic nomination for president, he identifies as a democratic socialist.

Below is an abbreviated outline of Sanders' academic, professional, and political career:

  • 2007 - Present: U.S. Senator from Vermont
  • 1991-2007: Member of the United States House of Representatives
  • 1981-1989: Mayor of Burlington, Vermont
Elections

2020

Presidency

An election for president of the United States will be held on November 3, 2020. Sanders announced that he was running for president on February 19, 2019.

2018

General election
General election for U.S. Senate Vermont

The following candidates ran in the general election for U.S. Senate Vermont on November 6, 2018.

Bernie Sanders (Independent)
67.3%
183,649 Votes

Lawrence Zupan (R)
27.4%
74,663 Votes

Brad Peacock (Independent)
1.4%
3,787 Votes

Russell Beste (Independent)
1.0%
2,763 Votes

Edward Gilbert Jr. (Independent)
0.8%
2,244 Votes

Folasade Adeluola (Independent)
0.7%
1,979 Votes

Jon Svitavsky (Independent)
0.5%
1,280 Votes

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Reid Kane (Liberty Union Party)
0.4%
1,171 Votes

Bruce Busa (Independent)
0.3%
914 Votes
Other/Write-in votes
0.1%
294 Votes

Total votes: 272,744

Democratic primary election
Democratic primary for U.S. Senate Vermont

Incumbent Bernie Sanders defeated Folasade Adeluola in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate Vermont on August 14, 2018.

Bernie Sanders (D)
94.4%
63,322 Votes

Folasade Adeluola (D)
5.6%
3,748 Votes

Total votes: 67,070

Republican primary election
Republican primary for U.S. Senate Vermont

H. Brooke Paige defeated Lawrence Zupan, Jasdeep Pannu, and Roque De La Fuente in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate Vermont on August 14, 2018.

H. Brooke Paige (R)
39.6%
9,805 Votes

Lawrence Zupan (R)
37.9%
9,383 Votes

Jasdeep Pannu (R)
18.3%
4,527 Votes

Roque De La Fuente (R)
4.3%
1,057 Votes

Total votes: 24,772


2016

Presidency

Sanders was a Democratic candidate for the office of President of the United States in 2016. He made his candidacy official on April 30, 2015. He was the second Democratic candidate to formally announce his entry into the race, following Hillary Clinton. On July 12, 2016, Sanders endorsed Hillary Clinton for president but not did formally suspend his campaign.

2012

Sanders ran for re-election in the 2012 election for the U.S. Senate, representing Vermont. Sanders ran unopposed in the Democratic primary on August 28, 2012. He also ran as an independent. He defeated John MacGovern (R), Cris Ericson (United States Marijuana Party), Laurel LaFramboise (VoteKISS), Pete Diamondstone (Liberty Union) and Peter Moss (Peace and Prosperity) in the general election on November 6, 2012.

U.S. Senate, Vermont, General Election, 2012

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Independent Green check mark transparent.pngBernie Sanders Incumbent 71.1% 207,848
Republican John MacGovern 24.9% 72,898
Third Cris Ericson 2% 5,924
Third Laurel LaFramboise 0.3% 877
Third Peter Moss 0.8% 2,452
Third Pete Diamondstone 0.9% 2,511
Total Votes 292,510
Source: Vermont Board of Elections, "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Full history


Policy Positions

2020

Abortion

1. Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-choice

Budget

1. In order to balance the budget, do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- Yes

2. Do you support expanding federal funding to support entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare?
- Yes

Education

1. Do you support requiring states to adopt federal education standards?
- Yes

Energy & Environment

1. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- Yes

2. Do you support government funding for the development of renewable energy (e.g. solar, wind, geo-thermal)?
- Yes

Guns

1. Do you generally support gun-control legislation?
- Yes

Health Care

1. Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")?
- No

Campaign Finance

1. Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Yes

Economy

1. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

2. Do you support lowering corporate taxes as a means of promoting economic growth?
- No

Immigration

1. Do you support the construction of a wall along the Mexican border?
- No

2. Do you support requiring immigrants who are unlawfully present to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- No

National Security

1. Should the United States use military force to prevent governments hostile to the U.S. from possessing a weapon of mass destruction (for example: nuclear, biological, chemical)?
- Unknown Position

2. Do you support reducing military intervention in Middle East conflicts?
- Yes

Trade

Do you generally support removing barriers to international trade (for example: tariffs, quotas, etc.)?
- No

Defense

Do you support increasing defense spending?
- No

Vermont Congressional Election 2012 Political Courage Test

Abortion

1. Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-choice

2. Other or expanded principles
- I support a woman's right to choose.

Budget

Indicate which proposals you support (if any) for balancing the federal budget.

In order to balance the budget,

1. Other or expanded principles
- We should move toward serious deficit reduction, most importantly by taxing the wealthy, who do not pay their fair share of the tax burden, and by closing tax loopholes for large corporations and corporations which ship jobs abroad to fatten their corporate profits. We should NOT blance the buget on the shoulders of the elderly, children, the poor, veterans or the currently hard-pressed middle class.

2. do you support reducing defense spending?
- Yes

3. do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- Yes

4. do you support reducing Medicaid spending?
- No

5. do you support reducing Medicare spending?
- No

6. Is balancing the budget a legislative priority?
- Yes

Education

1. Other or expanded principles
- I believe states, which along with communities have traditionally been the main support for our public schools, should be the entities which decide on reforms. I strongly support both early education (and child care) and extended education (after school programs, summer programs) as ways to strengthen our education of children and youth. I strongly support Pell grants, which help make college more affordable to the children of working families

2. Do you support requiring states to implement education reforms in order to be eligible for competitive federal grants?
- No

Guns

1. Do you support restrictions on the purchase and possession of guns?
- Unknown Position

2. Other or expanded principles
- I believe that most concerns about owndership, purchase and possession of guns is best addressed at the state level. As a senator, I believe in deferring this question to the states.

Health Care

1. Other or expanded principles
- The Affordable Care Act is a step forward toward universal health care, but it is imperfect, and so I voted for it but without strongly endorsing it. I have long believed that health care is a right of every citizen -- every citizen -- and that the best way to achieve a strong and fair health care system is through a Medicare-for-all, single payer system. I have consistently introduced, and strongly supported, legislation to establish a single-payer approach to health care.

2. Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act?
- Yes

3. Should individuals be required to purchase health insurance, as mandated in the 2010 Affordable Care Act?
- Yes

Social Security

1. Do you support allowing individuals to divert a portion of their Social Security taxes into personal retirement accounts?
- No

2. Other or expanded principles
- I am opposed to the privatization of Social Security.

Campaign Finance

1. Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- Citizens United, which decided that corporations are persons and have an almost unlimited capacity to contribute to political campaigns and the issues which shape political campaigns, is one of the two or three worst decisions in the history of the Supreme Court. I jhave introduced legislation which would, by constitutional amendment, reverse Citizens United.

Economy

1. Other or expanded principles
- [...support the temporary extension of tax relief?] Candidate answered "Yes" and "No". I support the extention of tax relief for middle class and working families. I do not, emphatically, support the extension of tax breaks for those earning over $250,000 a year. I believe that federal investment in infrastructure both creates jobs, and makes our nation stronger and more economically competitive. In terms of stimulating our economy and creationg jobs -- as well as sustaining those trapped by this severe economic recession -- I think both unemployment compensation at food stamps are essential to support Americans devastated by the recession.

2. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Yes

3. Do you support providing tax incentives to businesses for the purpose of job creation?
- Yes

4. Do you support spending on infrastructure projects for the purpose of job creation?
- Yes

5. Do you support the temporary extension of unemployment benefits?
- Yes

6. Do you support the 2010 temporary extension of tax relief?
- No Answer

Immigration

1. Do you support allowing illegal immigrants, who were brought to the United States as minors, to pursue citizenship without returning to their country of origin?
- Yes

2. Do you support the enforcement of federal immigration law by state and local police?
- No Answer

3. Do you support requiring illegal immigrants to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- No

4. Other or expanded principles
- Legal immigration is and should be our practice and our goal. But with 11.5 undocumented immigrants currently residing in the US, we must address that reality. I support the DREAM Act, which would confer citizenship on young people who grew up in the United States if they serve in the military or graduate from high school. The 14th amendment of the Constitution makes the federal government, not the states, the arbiter of citizenship.

National Security

1. Should the U.S use military force in order to prevent Iran from possessing a nuclear weapon?
- No

2. Do you support targeting suspected terrorists outside of official theaters of conflict?
- No

3. Other or expanded principles
- While we must aggressively pursue international terrorists and all of those who would do us harm, we must do it in a way that protects the Constitution and the civil liberties which make us proud to be Americans.

Administrative Priorities

Please explain in a total of 100 words or less, your top two or three priorities if elected. If they require additional funding for implementation, please explain how you would obtain this funding.
- REversing the decline of the middle class, which is in good measure due to outsourcing of American jobs and an unfair tax code which has greatly reduced taxes on the wealthy while their share of both the ntion's ealth and its income have soared dramatically, REducign glob al warming and creating new, good-paying jbos by investing in sustainable energy and eenrgy efficiency. Bringing transparency to the banking industry, to the Federal Reserve, and to military contracting.

Environment

1. Do you believe that human activity is contributing to climate change?
- Yes

2. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- Yes

3. Other or expanded principles
- Global warming, and climate change, are one of the great challenges we face today. We must act aggressively to reduce carbon emissions. Solar, wind, thermal and biomass can greatly help us to move in tht direction. I ction. So can the development of hybrid-electric and electric vehicles, energy efficiency, and greater investment in mass transit.

Capital Punishment

1. Do you support capital punishment for certain crimes?
- No Answer

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Energy

1. Do you support reducing restrictions on offshore energy production?
- No

2. Other or expanded principles
- Global warming is real, and a threat to not only future generations, but to our very planet itself. I strongly support sustainable energy -- solar, wind, biomass, geothermal -- as a way to reduce carbon emissions, and to reduce our dependence of foreign oil.

Marriage

1. Do you support same-sex marriage?
- Yes

2. Other or expanded principles
- No Answer

Spending and Taxes

Spending

Indicate what federal spending levels (#1-6) you support for the following general categories. Select one number per category; you can use a number more than once.

1. Agriculture
- Slightly Decrease

2. Arts
- Maintain Status

3. Defense
- Greatly Decrease

4. Education
- Greatly Increase

5. Environment
- Slightly Increase

6. Homeland Security
- Maintain Status

7. International aid
- Maintain Status

8. Medical Research
- Slightly Increase

9. Scientific Research
- Maintain Status

10. Space exploration
- Slightly Decrease

11. United Nations
- Maintain Status

12. Welfare
- Maintain Status

13. Other or expanded categories
- 1 Develop sustainable energy and create green jobs6 Eliminate corporte welfare

Taxes

Indicate what federal tax levels (#1-6) you support for the following general categories. Select one number per category; you can use a number more than once.

1. Other or expanded categories
- Payroll taxes: I favor ending the payroll tax reduction, which was instituted as a short-term measure to stimulate the economy, because over the long term it will weaken the Social Security Trust Fund. I favor removing the cap on payroll taxes for those earning over $250,000 a year, because doing so would guarantee that all Social Security benefits could be paid for the next 75 years. I believe, I stated earlier, that the wealthy and corporations need to pay their fair share of taxes.

2. Capital gains taxes
- Greatly Increase

3. Corporate taxes
- Greatly Increase

4. Excise taxes (alcohol)
- Maintain Status

5. Excise taxes (cigarettes)
- Maintain Status

6. Excise taxes (transportation fuel)
- Maintain Status

7. Income taxes (low-income families)
- Slightly Decrease

8. Income taxes (middle-income families)
- Maintain Status

9. Income taxes (high-income families)
- Greatly Increase

10. Inheritance taxes
- Greatly Increase

11. Payroll taxes
- No Answer

Afghanistan

1. Do you support United States' combat operations in Afghanistan?
- No

2. Do you support a timetable for withdrawal from Afghanistan?
- Yes

3. Other or expanded principles
- I support a timetable for quick and complete US withdrawal from Afghanistan. We went to war against Afghanistan to capture Osama bin Laden. He is now dead, and our reason for being there no longer pertains/.

Articles

Can Any of These Candidates Win the Democratic Nomination?

Jan. 24

We are fast approaching the stretch run of the Democratic nomination contest, with just over a week to go until Iowans vote. At this point, things can happen quickly, as candidates catch fire or peter out. The difficulty of polling the caucuses compounds this issue, as pollsters try to estimate a relatively select electorate in a state where you can register to vote on Election Day. Looking over the field of (loosely) six viable candidates, it’s a lot easier to make arguments for why each can’t be the nominee than why each can.  Amy Klobuchar: Klobuchar’s best shot at becoming the nominee probably evaporated after the last Democratic debate.  Her storyline was straightforward: She was a moderately liberal female senator from a swing area of the country. In a year where Democratic voters claimed that beating Donald Trump was the most important factor in their voting, she seemed well poised to become the establishment pick, especially if Joe Biden faltered. It hasn’t turned out that way.  Biden has proved remarkably resilient, and while Klobuchar had some credible debate performances as she got more questions on the stage, and her position in the polls has improved, that improvement hasn’t been enough to put her on a trajectory to win Iowa and eventually secure the nomination.  Perhaps she manages to come in third or fourth, and can translate that into a Rubio-2016-win-by-placing-third storyline, but that isn’t what things are looking like right now. Michael Bloomberg: I made the case for Bloomberg previously, and continue to believe that he is running the best campaign that Michael Bloomberg can run.  He’s getting some traction in the national polls, and if Biden stumbles in Iowa and Bernie Sanders looms large, the former New York mayor could quickly become a player. At the same time, things really have to align for him for that to happen.  Sanders probably needs to roll through the early states, and Biden has to limp out of South Carolina badly damaged.  Democrats will also have to decide that they’re fine with a billionaire who was elected as a Republican, who endorsed George W. Bush in 2004, and who oversaw stop-and-frisk.  Needless to say, he doesn’t fit the zeitgeist. Pete Buttigieg: The Butti-bounce seems to be over.  After leading by almost six points in Iowa in early December, Mayor Pete is now in fourth place, with a downward trajectory.  It isn’t inconceivable that he could rally – again, the difference between first and fourth is well within the traditional polling error in Iowa, but it seems unlikely.  Even if he does, he is currently in fifth place in South Carolina, behind Tom Steyer.  His weakness in the South becomes a real liability in a fight against Biden down the stretch. Elizabeth Warren: For a while, Warren looked like she might be on Kamala Harris’ decline to irrelevance, but she actually seems to have stabilized around 15% nationally.  She’s now back in third place in Iowa, and is only four points out of first. She isn’t really out of contention right now. At the same time, her post-Iowa polling is in pretty dire shape: fourth place in New Hampshire, third place in Nevada, and third place in South Carolina.  Of course, Warren would presumably get a bounce if she wins Iowa, but it might not be enough.  Bernie Sanders: Sanders seems to be surging, but the reality check looms: Even if he sweeps the first three states, he is likely to get trounced in South Carolina and will have a difficult time in other Southern states.  He could sweep Super Tuesday in the North and win California, perhaps with an assist from Bloomberg, but still find himself trailing in delegates. More importantly, he is likely to face a full-throated attack from the Democratic establishment and (perhaps more importantly) center-left media outlets if he looks to be on track to become the nominee. He was treated with relative kid gloves by Hillary Clinton in 2016, but if he is a genuine contender, many Democrats will work tirelessly to defeat him, or at least to throw the election to the convention.  This dynamic would have mattered more 20 years ago, when the party and media had stronger gatekeeping functions, but it will still matter. Joe Biden: I had assumed that Biden would play the role of Jeb Bush in the 2016 Republican Party: The establishment candidate no one really wanted. He has held up surprisingly well, and the better argument now is probably that he is Mitt Romney in 2012: The stable candidate who wins after the party “tries out” a bunch of alternatives that can’t work. We should remember, though, that Romney’s opponents – Herman Cain, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich – weren’t as strong as Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders.  They began as relative unknowns, unlike the current crop of Democrats, who all have genuine bases of support within the party.  Can a Democrat whom everyone seems lukewarm about really knock out all of these other candidates?  Perhaps.  But this also seems like a recipe for underperforming polls in the caucus states, Biden losing the first three contests and limping out of South Carolina with a fresh Bloomberg awaiting. So who will win?  It really is anyone’s ballgame at this point. Maybe Biden is the strongest bet right now.  But since all of the candidates’ paths to victory are fairly tenuous, no one should be anywhere near 50%, much less above it.Source: https://www.realclearpolitics.com/

Hillary Puts Bernie Into Her Basket of Deplorables

Jan. 24

"Nobody likes him, nobody wants to work with him, he got nothing done. He was a career politician." So says Hillary Clinton of her former Senate colleague and 2016 rival for the Democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders. Her assessment of Sanders' populist-socialist agenda? "It's all just baloney and I feel so bad that people got sucked into it." Does that assessment still hold with Sanders now running strong in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada, and having emerged, according to The New York Times, as "the dominant liberal force in the 2020 race"? "Yes, it does," said Clinton, who left open the possibility she might not support Sanders if he became the nominee. In her interview with The Hollywood Reporter to promote a documentary that premieres Saturday at the Sundance Film Festival, Clinton also tore into Bernie's backers. "It is not only him. It's the culture around him. It's his leadership team. It's his prominent supporters. It's his online Bernie Bros and their relentless attacks on lots of his competitors, particularly the women," said Clinton. "It should be worrisome that he has permitted this culture -- not only permitted [he] seems to be very much supporting it." From her own words, Clinton regards Sanders as a nasty man running a misogynistic campaign and a political phony whose achievements are nonexistent and who lacks the temperament to be president. As Clinton describes Sanders, he seems to fit nicely into her Trumpian "basket of deplorables." Reflecting the significance of Clinton's attack, The New York Times put it on Page 1. This comes one week after Elizabeth Warren, at the end of the last debate, confronted Sanders, who had denied ever telling her a woman could not win the presidency. "I think you just called me a liar on national TV," said Warren, twice. Sanders assuredly had. He then accused Warren of lying. This is "a part of a pattern," says Clinton, noting that Sanders said in 2016 that she was not qualified to be president. What is Hillary up to? She is "hellbent on stopping Sanders," says Obama strategist David Axelrod. The bad blood between Bernie and two leading women in the Democratic Party calls to mind the battle between Nelson Rockefeller and Barry Goldwater, which did not end well for the Republican Party in 1964. While the eventual GOP nominee, Goldwater, lost in a 44-state landslide to Lyndon Johnson, the liberal Republican establishment that Rockefeller led would never again be able to nominate one of its own. It is difficult to see how this acrimony inside the Democratic Party -- over the character, record, ideology and alleged sexism of Sen. Bernie Sanders -- ends well for the Democrats. Already, Bernie's backers believe the DNC "rigged" the nomination in 2016 by feigning neutrality while secretly aiding Clinton. If Sanders now fails in the first primaries and loses his last chance for the Democratic nomination because of the Clinton-Warren's attacks, it is difficult to see how Bernie's backers enthusiastically support Warren. As for Bernie backing Biden, the raison d'etre of the liberal-radical wing of the party to whom Sanders is a hero is that the Democratic establishment consistently sells out progressive values. Sanders' crowd consists of true believers, a trademark of whom is militancy. Such folks often prefer defeat behind a principled leader to victory for a corporatist Democrat they regard as the enemy within. Assume Bernie defeats Warren in Iowa, bests Biden in New Hampshire, and then goes on to win the nomination. Would women, a majority of whom vote Democratic, and who are indispensable to party victory, surge to the polls to install a president whom Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren describe as a sexist who ruined their own presidential hopes? Would Democratic women come out to vote for a candidate who was responsible, in two successive presidential elections, for keeping the glass ceiling firmly intact over the heads of the Democratic Party's leading female candidates? Bernie has made some bad enemies. Ten days before the Iowa caucuses, the great unifier of the Democratic Party remains Donald Trump. But now, with Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina dead ahead, the Democrats' focus is becoming: Who should replace Trump? The rival claims of the constituent elements inside the party are rising to the fore. And what they reveal is a Democratic Party that is a coalition of groups that seem to be dividing along the lines of ideology, politics, race, class and culture. Consider the most loyal of Democratic constituents in presidential elections: African Americans. They are 13% of the electorate but a fourth of the national Democratic vote. Yet, of the six candidates for the nomination on stage in the last debate, not one was African American. Not one was Hispanic or Asian. Four were white men, and two were white women. The lone outsider rising in the polls is another white man, a multibillionaire who is willing to spend a billion dollars to buy the presidential nomination of the party of the common man. Source: https://www.realclearpolitics.com/

Democratic Attacks on Sanders Are Long Overdue

Jan. 23

Bernie Sanders' campaign recently stabbed Elizabeth Warren in the back. She was the Vermont senator's comrade in arms. It also threw a pack of lies at Joe Biden, tarring him as corrupt with zero evidence. As former Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin told Politico, Sanders "will play dirty." The Democrat added, "I'm concerned that we're seeing a replay of the kind of dynamics that didn't allow Hillary to win." The difference between now and 2016, though, is that Sanders' targets are finally hitting back. This outbreak of hostilities among Democrats is not hurting the party. On the contrary. An airing of these grievances is long overdue. And whether one shares Sanders' political views is irrelevant to this conversation. (I like some of them.) The danger Sanders poses for the party is that, to him, electing Democrats comes second to building the "movement." This explains why his sidekick, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is pushing primary challenges to moderate Democrats who won difficult races in swing districts. The catchphrase on Sanders' website, Our Revolution, is "Campaigns end. Revolutions Endure." Indeed, he and his fellow socialists have latched on to the Democratic Party because having a D after their names is the only way they can win an election. Few things make the Bernie base madder than the charge that their hero helped sabotage Clinton's candidacy. Its members passionately note that he politicked for her in the last days of the campaign. That's true, but by then, not doing so was tantamount to openly supporting Donald Trump. Early in 2016, when it seemed possible that Sanders might score more votes than Clinton, he assailed the superdelegates who mostly backed Clinton and could have delivered her victory. His supporters demanded that superdelegates reflect the popular vote, "not the party elites." By June, when Clinton had racked up a commanding majority of primary votes, Sanders did an about face and urged the superdelegates to ignore the voters and support him. "Superdelegates have a very important decision to make," he told NBC News. Upon winning the Republican nomination, Trump announced, "To all of those Bernie Sanders voters who have been left out in the cold by a rigged system of superdelegates, we welcome you with open arms." Trump was the official Republican candidate, and Sanders still wouldn't back the Democratic one. In the weeks leading up to the Democratic National Convention, he withheld his endorsement of Clinton, insisting that certain demands be met. Some of his delegates chanted, "Lock her up!" right on the convention floor. Sanders (and Trump's Russian trolls) had brainwashed some liberals and independents into believing that Clinton was horribly corrupt. That helps explain why 20 percent of those who voted for Sanders in the primaries did not vote for Clinton in the general election. Some of his supporters are now spreading the fear that history could repeat itself if a moderate such as Biden becomes the nominee. Elaine Godfrey wrote in The Atlantic that progressive organizers she has spoken with said they are "worried that, absent a Democratic candidate who excites them, many Americans might not vote at all." Trump should excite them enough. People who don't get that they are voting against as well as for are political neuters. Are they going to help reelect Trump on Tuesday and then rage on Wednesday that he's burning up the planet? Yes, mainstream Democrats had to have it out with the heretic hunters of the left. The person most displeased by this counterattack on Sanders surely must be Trump. Sanders is the candidate Trump most wants to run against. And that should tell Democrats something. Source: https://www.realclearpolitics.com/

Debates/Survey

2020

Feb. 22
Caucus for Bernie in Nevada

Sat 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM PST

Nevada

Feb. 11
Vote for Bernie in New Hampshire

Tue 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM EST

New Hampshire

Feb. 3
Caucus for Bernie in Iowa

Mon 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM CST

Iowa

Voter Guide

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