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Quick Facts
Personal Details

Josh Hawley (Republican) is a member of the U.S. Senate from Missouri. Hawley was elected to the office on November 6, 2018. He defeated two-term incumbent Claire McCaskill (D) and challengers Craig O'Dear (Independent), Japheth Campbell (L), and Jo Crain (G) in the general election, after advancing from the Republican primary election on August 7, 2018. At 39 years of age, Hawley is the youngest member of the U.S. Senate during the 116th Congress.

Prior to his election to the U.S. Senate, Hawley served as the attorney general of Missouri from 2017 to 2019. He litigated and won two cases at the Supreme Court of the United States. He was the co-counsel on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

Hawley graduated with honors from Stanford University. He then attended Yale Law School; while there, he led the Yale branch of the Federalist Society and served as articles editor for The Yale Law Journal. After receiving his law degree, he earned clerkships at the U.S. Court of Appeals, 10th Circuit, and at the Supreme Court of the United States. He also served as a litigator in the national appellate practice of Hogan Lovells US LLP in Washington, D.C.

He has taught constitutional law at the University of Missouri law school and served as senior counsel to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty. He litigated and won two cases at the Supreme Court of the United States. He was the co-counsel on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

Along with David Kennedy, Hawley is the author of Theodore Roosevelt: Preacher of Righteousness, published by the Yale University Press in 2008.

Hawley lives in central Missouri with his wife, Erin—also a national appellate lawyer—and their two sons.

Education

  • JD, Yale Law School, 2003-2006
  • AB, History, Stanford University, 1998-2002

Professional Experience

  • JD, Yale Law School, 2003-2006
  • AB, History, Stanford University, 1998-2002
  • Associate Professor, University of Missouri School of Law, 2011-present
  • Former Teacher, Saint Paul's School, London
  • Of Counsel, Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, 2011-2015
  • Founder/President, Missouri Liberty Project, 2014-2015
  • Attorney, Hogan Lovells, United States Limited Liability Company, 2008-2011
  • Judicial Clerk, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, United States Supreme Court, 2007-2008
  • Judicial Clerk, Judge Michael W. McConnell, United States 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, 2006-2007

Political Experience

  • JD, Yale Law School, 2003-2006
  • AB, History, Stanford University, 1998-2002
  • Associate Professor, University of Missouri School of Law, 2011-present
  • Former Teacher, Saint Paul's School, London
  • Of Counsel, Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, 2011-2015
  • Founder/President, Missouri Liberty Project, 2014-2015
  • Attorney, Hogan Lovells, United States Limited Liability Company, 2008-2011
  • Judicial Clerk, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, United States Supreme Court, 2007-2008
  • Judicial Clerk, Judge Michael W. McConnell, United States 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, 2006-2007
  • Senator, United States Senate, Missouri, 2019-present
  • Attorney General, State of Missouri, 2017-2019
  • Candidate, United States Senate, Missouri, 2018
  • Candidate, Attorney General, State of Missouri, 2016

Current Legislative Committees

Member, Armed Services

Member, Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

Member, Judiciary

Member, Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations

Member, Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Member, Special Committee on Aging

Member, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights

Member, Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration

Chair, Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism

Member, Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities

Member, Subcommittee on Federal Spending Oversight and Emergency Management

Member, Subcommittee on Seapower

Member, Subcommittee on Strategic Forces

Religious, Civic, and other Memberships

  • JD, Yale Law School, 2003-2006
  • AB, History, Stanford University, 1998-2002
  • Associate Professor, University of Missouri School of Law, 2011-present
  • Former Teacher, Saint Paul's School, London
  • Of Counsel, Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, 2011-2015
  • Founder/President, Missouri Liberty Project, 2014-2015
  • Attorney, Hogan Lovells, United States Limited Liability Company, 2008-2011
  • Judicial Clerk, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, United States Supreme Court, 2007-2008
  • Judicial Clerk, Judge Michael W. McConnell, United States 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, 2006-2007
  • Senator, United States Senate, Missouri, 2019-present
  • Attorney General, State of Missouri, 2017-2019
  • Candidate, United States Senate, Missouri, 2018
  • Candidate, Attorney General, State of Missouri, 2016
  • Former President/Member, Federalist Society, Yale University
  • Member, Supreme Court Bar

Other Info

— Awards:

  • National Appellate Attorney and Former United States Supreme Court clerk

— Publications:

  • "Theodore Roosevelt: Preacher of Righteousness"

Policy Positions

2020

Abortion

Do you generally support pro-choice or pro-life legislation?
- Pro-life

Budget

1. In order to balance the budget, do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?
- No

2. In order to balance the budget, do you support reducing defense spending?
- Unknown Position

Campaign Finance

Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?
- Unknown Position

Economy

1. Do you support federal spending as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Unknown Position

2. Do you support lowering corporate taxes as a means of promoting economic growth?
- Unknown Position

Education

Do you support requiring states to adopt federal education standards?
- Unknown Position

Energy & Environment

1. Do you support government funding for the development of renewable energy (e.g. solar, wind, thermal)?
- Unknown Position

2. Do you support the federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions?
- No

Guns

Do you generally support gun-control legislation?
- No

Health Care

Do you support repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")?
- Yes

Immigration

1. Do you support the construction of a wall along the Mexican border?
- Yes

2. Do you support requiring immigrants who are unlawfully present to return to their country of origin before they are eligible for citizenship?
- Unknown Position

Marijuana

Do you support the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes?
- Unknown Position

National Security

1. Should the United States use military force in order to prevent governments hostile to the U.S. from possessing a nuclear weapon?
- Unknown Position

2. Do you support increased American intervention in Middle Eastern conflicts beyond air support?
- Unknown Position

Congress Bills
Elections

2018

General election
General election for U.S. Senate Missouri

Josh Hawley (R) defeated incumbent Claire McCaskill (D), Craig O'Dear (Independent), Japheth Campbell (L), and Jo Crain (G) in the general election for U.S. Senate Missouri on November 6, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Josh Hawley (R)
51.4
1,254,927

Claire McCaskill (D)
45.6
1,112,935

Craig O'Dear (Independent)
1.4
34,398

Japheth Campbell (L)
1.1
27,316

Jo Crain (G)
0.5
12,706
Other/Write-in votes
0.0
7

Total votes: 2,442,289
Democratic primary election
Democratic primary for U.S. Senate Missouri

The following candidates ran in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate Missouri on August 7, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Claire McCaskill (D)
82.6
500,162

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

Carla Wright (D)
6.8
40,971

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

John Hogan (D)
2.6
15,928

Silhouette Placeholder Image.png

David Faust (D)
2.6
15,902

Angelica Earl (D)
2.6
15,453

Travis Gonzalez (D)
1.6
9,453

Leonard Steinman (D)
1.3
7,634

Total votes: 605,503
Republican primary election
Republican primary for U.S. Senate Missouri

The following candidates ran in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate Missouri on August 7, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Josh Hawley (R)
58.6
389,006

Tony Monetti (R)
9.8
64,718

Austin Petersen (R)
8.3
54,810

Kristi Nichols (R)
7.5
49,554

Christina Smith (R)
5.3
34,948

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Ken Patterson (R)
2.9
19,537

Peter Pfeifer (R)
2.5
16,557

Courtland Sykes (R)
2.1
13,862

Fred Ryman (R)
1.3
8,763

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Brian Hagg (R)
1.0
6,913

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Bradley Krembs (R)
0.7
4,885

Total votes: 663,553
Libertarian primary election
Libertarian primary for U.S. Senate Missouri

Japheth Campbell advanced from the Libertarian primary for U.S. Senate Missouri on August 7, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Japheth Campbell (L)
100
5,357

Total votes: 5,357
Green Party primary election
Green primary for U.S. Senate Missouri

Jo Crain defeated Jerome H. Bauer in the green primary for U.S. Senate Missouri on August 7, 2018.

Candidate
%
Votes

Jo Crain (G)
57.5
902

Jerome H. Bauer (G)
42.5
666

Total votes: 1,568


2016

Josh Hawley defeated Teresa Hensley in the Missouri attorney general election.
Missouri Attorney General, 2016
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
Republican Green check mark transparent.png Josh Hawley 61.10% 1,389,196
Democratic Teresa Hensley 38.90% 884,354
Total Votes 2,273,550
Source: Missouri Secretary of State
Josh Hawley defeated Kurt Schaefer in the Missouri Republican primary for attorney general.
Missouri Republican primary for attorney general, 2016
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.png Josh Hawley 64.22% 415,702
Kurt Schaefer 35.78% 231,657
Total Votes (3214 of 3214 precincts reporting) 647,359
Source: Missouri Secretary of State
Speeches
Articles

The Washington Post - Op-Ed: Americans are ready for a comeback. Congress must help unleash it.

Apr. 9, 2020

By Josh Hawley America is experiencing a moment of crisis, but it need not be a period of decline. From our great cities to our rural towns, Americans everywhere are making enormous sacrifices for the sake of their fellow citizens. It is clear from these selfless acts -- nurses and physicians working long into the night; delivery workers bringing essential goods to their neighbors' doors; church groups assembling care packages for the ill -- that Americans' love of country is undimmed and American courage is unshaken. In fact, Americans are ready for a comeback. And Congress must help to unleash it. The stakes are high. We are in the midst of the greatest health crisis in a century, with an economic crisis to match it. Because of government health measures adopted to fight the virus, millions of Americans have been laid off in a matter of weeks, wiping away years of job gains. Small businesses are struggling to keep the lights on. And lifesaving medical products needed to fight this virus are in short supply. Now is the time for bold measures to answer this hour's need and position this nation to surge ahead once the disease is broken. That is why the next round of coronavirus relief legislation is critical. Congress must get it right. We cannot afford to make a few fixes to existing programs and hope for the best. We must think differently and be bold. Here is what I propose: Because the government has taken the step of closing the economy to protect public health, Congress should in turn protect every single job in this country for the duration of this crisis. And Congress should help our businesses rehire every worker who has already lost a job because of the coronavirus. Beginning immediately, the federal government should cover 80 percent of wages for workers at any U.S. business, up to the national median wage, until this emergency is over. Further, it should offer businesses a bonus for rehiring workers laid off over the past month. The goal must be to get unemployment down -- now -- to secure American workers and their families, and to help businesses get ready to restart as soon as possible. This approach will prepare us to surge into recovery. Workers will benefit from the steady paycheck and the knowledge that their jobs are safe. And businesses, able to retain their workforce at little cost, will be poised for success once the economy reopens. We must also move decisively to secure our critical supply chains and bring production back to this country. The present crisis has revealed just how vital domestic production is to our national life. And yet, for decades, an alliance of big government and big business conspired to outsource the manufacturing of our most crucial supplies and equipment to China and other overseas sites. Now, dangerous shortages of key medical supplies reveal just how self-serving and reckless those decisions were. It is past time to secure our supply chains by adopting strong local-content requirements for all industries essential to our crisis response, to be phased in when the current emergency ends. These measures should be paired with generous financing for all businesses looking to move back home. Finally, in an effort to protect our small businesses from a feeding frenzy by bigger firms, Congress must crack down on crisis profiteering by Wall Street. Strong antitrust enforcement and stiffer corporate transparency rules will help to ensure that, when our economy gets moving, we don't have a wave of mergers and liquidations that set our workers back yet again. As the stakes mount, some in Congress will no doubt be tempted to fall back on old ideas and programs, such as tweaking the tax code or spending more on pet projects. But that approach is not equal to this moment. Make no mistake, the cost of addressing this crisis will be substantial: Some economists estimate the price tag on meeting unemployment claims may rise to the hundreds of billions. But better that money be spent on saving jobs now and getting Americans ready to work than on bailouts and mass unemployment claims for months and months to come. Congress must choose a comeback. We can adopt a bold program of protection and renewal that will secure our workers and turbocharge our economy for the years to come, if we have the foresight and the courage. It's time to go all in on the future. It's time to go all in on America.

Tested negative for coronavirus on October 3, 2020

Jan. 1, 1900

On October 3, 2020, Hawley announced that he had tested negative for coronavirus.

Electoral vote certification on January 6-7, 2021

Jan. 1, 1900

Congress convened a joint session on January 6-7, 2021, to count electoral votes by state and confirm the results of the 2020 presidential election. Hawley voted against certifying the electoral votes from Arizona and Pennsylvania. The Senate rejected both objections by a vote of 6-93 for Arizona and 7-92 for Pennsylvania.

Funding
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Financial Summary October 23, 2020 00:16 ET

Period Receipts Disbursements CashOnHand DebtsLoans
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Source:Federal Election Commission